Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
bikerdude

Best s775 mobo for 500+FSB...?

Recommended Posts

Afternoon

 

I have been looking to buy a descent s775 mobo for my shiney E6600....

 

My old system was a LP NF4, running a Opty [email protected](300-FSBx9.5), Gskill [email protected], raid 0 (80gbx3_sata) Im looking to achive the same level of Oc_ability(so in this case 450-500+FSB) and the same level of memory stability and finaly to be able to run a sata raid setup.

 

I have bought the Asus commando, while I/we wait for the DFI p965/i680 to make an appearence....

 

Turns out this board isnt the uber overclocker, and the £142 is a bit steep, so Im considering weither to keep it or not. Picked up a Gigabyte DS3 over the weekend to compare.... but the commando is better in every respect and after being used to the luxury and ease of use of a dfi/nvidia based board Picked up a not impressed with the DS3 (2 ports for raid - WTF, and its slow raid at that(crappy controller), 2x WD740 only gave me 110mb/s was expecting atleast 130+, my Hitachi deskstars give me 120+)

 

My E6600 is limited to 3.7ghz and here are the fsb's ive tried so far.

 

Commando:-

400x9 is stable, [email protected], [email protected]

411x9 is stable, [email protected], [email protected]

450x8 is stable, [email protected], [email protected]

462x8 is stable-ish, [email protected], [email protected] - will require tweaking

475x7 wont post, [email protected], [email protected]

500x7 wont post, [email protected], [email protected]

 

DS3:-

400x8 is stable, [email protected], [email protected]

450x8 is stable-ish, [email protected], [email protected] - will require tweaking

 

biker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gigabyte DS3 and DQ6 .Ive had my DS3 up to 515mhz personally so i know it will do what want and for only around $120 but it only has 2 sata port's capable of raid.Nowthe DQ6 has 6 but this board is over $200.Asus Has the

P5B deluxe which is a good board to. As is the Asus commando and the Abit AB9 and AB9 Quad GT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

500+ FSB speeds really mean nothing by themselves. Straps and behind the scene latency adjustments need to be considered. Depending on the board and chipset used, optimal FSB is usually somewhere between 395 and 460.

 

A board should be chosen that matches up with the available multipliers of the processor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
500+ FSB speeds really mean nothing by themselves. Straps and behind the scene latency adjustments need to be considered. Depending on the board and chipset used, optimal FSB is usually somewhere between 395 and 460.

 

A board should be chosen that matches up with the available multipliers of the processor.

Agreed.

 

You have to consider that, in most cases, 500+ FSB isn't the most optimal FSB frequency for optimal system performance.

 

I find 400-420 to be the best for my E6400, so in your case with a higher multiplier, it may even be a little bit lower.

 

(Assuming, of course, that you don't lower the CPU multiplier)

 

Definitely stay with the P965 chipset though.

 

I sometimes regret going with 975x in terms of its overclockability.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

975 won't get as high a FSB but, for any given FSB, for me, it's been faster.

 

975 won't work with higher dividers for me. At least with the p5w dh at higher FSBs(333 FSB DDR1000 works - 400 FSB DDR1000 does not - 450 FSB DDR670 works, etc).

 

 

965P definitely for getting to 500 I'd say.

 

I can't go over 476 on mine though. I've got it stable at 3.7, I think 3.8 is good since it ran dnetc for a day but I've yet to do an official test. The jump from 476 to 477 FSB in spite of any option I adjust gets me from a machine that can encode video/audio all day and run dnetc all day to a PC that won't even give me a BIOS flash screen, so maybe the ds3 wouldn't be the best option. Sure beat any 975 for me, however, in terms of high FSB and speed in pure CPU related applications.

 

Lastly, do consider that 500 FSB, while it may work, is in no way going to be truly stable. Overclocks that run prime for 20 hours in windows would fail in 20 minutes in linux.. and that gives you an idea of how much trouble it'll give in windows. Sometimes an overclock for me that worked for 25 hours in windows with prime95 worked for an hour in linux, and eventually in windows that overclock failed as well at the worst time. It'll fail with some random crash that at the time I THOUGHT was software/driver related until I did this test. So I went back to linux and turned on error checking options in the kernel, recompiled the kernel, ran mencoder over and over again until I could run it without a segmentation fault for a day, and that always worked in windows. It sucked to slaughter my overclock, but I think many would be surprised at just how much worse the average opteron 165 is at overclocking than the 2.8-3 GHz that they are known for when you go for cross-platform stability.

 

My point with that last paragraph is there's no way in hell you can expect that kind of stability with 500 FSB. I don't know if you do or don't, but if you do, you'll be unpleasantly surprised when you find out how impossible it is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Praz is bang on with what he said. On P965/975 boards, optimal FSB speed is around 425-450 from what I've experienced with my P5B-Deluxe and Infinity 975X. Bear in mind that compared to lower FSB speeds and higher multipliers, the performance boost with a higher FSB is only 3-5%.

 

Remember High FSB does not equate to better performance... As has always been true, CPU speed is King :)

 

On boards where you can adjust the straps (Asus and some others), this becomes slightly different, as you can adjust the straps to maximum efficiency without adjusting FSB. This means you can attain max performance at lower FSBs.

 

If real speed is your need (lol), the 680i is where it's at. Below is a list of tweaks (the only tweaks, btw) that I needed to do to get my 680i stable up to 526MHz Prime Stable (so far).

 

> Advanced Chipset Features

>> CPU Configuration

 

CPU Thermal control - disabled

C1E Enhanced holt state - disabled

Intel Speedstep - disabled

 

>Advanced Chipset Features

>> System Clocks

 

CPU Spread Spectrum - disabled

HT Spread Spectrum - disabled

PCIe Spread Spectrum SPP - disabled

PCIe Spread Spectrum MCP - disabled

Sata Spread Spectrum - disabled

 

> Advanced Chipset Features

>> System Voltages

 

CPU FSB - 1.50V from 1.20 (+ 0.300 = + 25%)

nForce SPP - 1.50V from 1.45 (+ 0.050 = + 3%)

With the above settings, I was running my E6600 at 526 x 7 (3682) @ 1.45v, and passed a full 24 hours of Prime. RAM was OCZ Reaper HPC running EPP settings of 5-5-5-15 @ 2.3v unlinked, with RAM speed set to 1200MHz.

 

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If real speed is your need (lol), the 680i is where it's at. Below is a list of tweaks (the only tweaks, btw) that I needed to do to get my 680i stable up to 526MHz Prime Stable (so far). With the above settings, I was running my E6600 at 526 x 7 (3682) @ 1.45v, and passed a full 24 hours of Prime. RAM was OCZ Reaper HPC running EPP settings of 5-5-5-15 @ 2.3v unlinked, with RAM speed set to 1200MHz. Cheers

 

1. can you post a cpuz/sisoft sandra/everest, screen shots..?

2. has the data corruption bug with i680 boards been fixed on that evga board of yours..

3. how have you managed to get such a high oc, when 99% of i680 owner cant crack the 430mark..?

 

biker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tell you what, the P5B deluxe so far has been able to do 500+, it's P965 chipset, tons of options...and less issues than the D3/6 boards. No corruption, all that good stuff. And the newest bios update adds support for the 1333 stap/cpu bus, and I expect there will be a bios for the 1666 strap/bus as well. So it will definitely support the new 45nm cpu's coming out soon.

 

Fanboyishness and all the words aside, it's probably the best board for the money spent. It's all Mad Shrimps uses for stressing the overclockability of ram kits, as it seems to be able to push the hardest, without the pickiness of Nvidia's chipsets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

×