Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

better to buy or build a desktop?


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
27 replies to this topic

#1 85Dave

85Dave

    New Member

  • Members
  • 34 posts

Posted 03 January 2007 - 03:45 AM

just wondering if its better to buy a desktop or build one?

whats the difference in speed, quality and price between both?

thanks

#2 ollietwinam

ollietwinam

    Certified Geek

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1096 posts

Posted 03 January 2007 - 03:53 AM

Buying is more convenient.

That's about it, it's cheaper (relative to the quality you get), faster and more satisfying building your own :D

#3 jfk

jfk

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 83 posts

Posted 03 January 2007 - 04:53 AM

If all you do is run office programs, email, and surf the web, it's hard to beat an inexpensive Dell. Not that I like them, but to build with quality components will cost more than a cheap Dell. If you want to build a quality unit, or are looking to do intense video editing or gaming, building your own is the only way to go. As you increase the performance needs of a PC, the cost of a Dell versus building your own increases exponentially. I can build a kickass gamer for less than a Dell XPS, OR, I can build a MUCH better gamer for the same price as a Dell XPS. So, the decision depends on what you want to do. Personally, I like to build and will never buy another Dell. JMO.

#4 JiveTurkey

JiveTurkey

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 336 posts

Posted 03 January 2007 - 04:54 AM

You might also keep in mind, given the responses you'll receive, the group that you've asked. I believe every single one of us will say "build." But there are some advantages to buying. Single contact for warranty, tech support, etc. But building will likely get you more of exactly what you want and a better price, but you are the system builder and provider of your own tech support (other than nice places like DFI Street, handful of vendors, etc.). But it is very satisfying to DIY.

#5 calvintang

calvintang

    Certified Geek

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1837 posts

Posted 03 January 2007 - 05:36 AM

building it is not that hard, and you have the assurance of quality parts.

Anyone notice that most prebuild pc's have the 24pin psu plug but the oem only give the psu that has 20pins only?

#6 radodrill

radodrill

    Resident EI

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6915 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Almost Heaven

Posted 03 January 2007 - 07:10 AM

Especially if you have an idea of what's going on in a PC then definitely build it yourself.

I once had a Dell laptop and actually knew more about what was going on than most of their techs. On one occasion I informed the tech what was wrong, he agreed; but their parts dispatcher decided it was something else and shipped the wrong part; Augh another call to Dell to straighten it out.
Project RAD-GT

Hardware: DFI LanParty NF680i SLI LT T2R/G | Intel Q6600 G0 | OCZ 2x1Gb Reaper DDR2-1150
2x BFG 8800 GTX (650/2000) | Creative X-Fi XtremeGamer | Silverstone Strider ST1000
WD 250Gb SATA | WD 400Gb SATA | Lite-On LH-20A1L SATA DVD-R/RW DL

Cooling: DangerDen TDX CPU| DangerDen Maze4 SB | DangerDen i875 NB
2x DangerDen 8800GTX | HW Labs BIX3 | HW Labs X-Flow BIX3 | LIANG D5

#7 Kingfisher

Kingfisher

    High Elf

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2963 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dallas, Texas

Posted 03 January 2007 - 08:18 AM

Single contact for warranty, tech support, etc.


It's amusing to me when someone talks of pre-builds that one of the first comments is how nice it would be to have good tech-support. Call Dell tech support, you will be lucky to get someone you can understand as well as be flooded with personal questions and un-related banter. You will be put on hold for long periods of time and be re-directed between their "tech levels".

Before anyone buys a pre-built PC be sure to check their customer satisfaction ratings. You will see dismal numbers there folks.
ASRock extreme 3 gen3
Intel i5 2500k Sandy Bridge
Patriot Signature 2x4GB PC3 12800
Sapphire HD 6850
Corsair Gaming Series GS600
Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO
Windows 7 Home Premium

so i stopped for a bit and destroyed a 12 layer lasagna,


#8 JiveTurkey

JiveTurkey

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 336 posts

Posted 03 January 2007 - 09:01 AM

I don't ever recall saying "good." But in my build I'm responsible for my own tech support and dealing with any (large) number of separate vendors/manufacturers for repair, replacement, etc. Dell consumers are paying to avoid that responsibility, regardless of how inept that support may actually be. There's a LOT of folks out there that would be completely lost without a tech support # they feel they can rely on.

#9 pkilway

pkilway

    Geek

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 946 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Zionsville, IN

Posted 03 January 2007 - 10:18 AM

If you don't mind tossing your pc every 18-24 months when you want to upgrade, then buy a prebuilt. For the price, they're not bad little systems. But if you ever wanted to upgrade the cpu, video card, add more hard drives, etc. LOOK OUT! A lot of the big builders use custom components (shared video and system memory - yuck!) so you may not have the option of another 2-4 SATA ports on the mobo (motherboard), or the mobo might have a custom bios what wont support voltages for higher level cpu's, etc.

With a custom build, you now exactly what you're getting and what upgrades you can make in the future. If a customer build is done correctly (read with quality components - ESPECIALLY the mobo), the guts of it should/could last you 2-3 years no problem (that's with upgrading the cpu and video), and your pc wont have any "noticable" performance difference to newer boxes.
Current PC:
CASE: COOLER MASTER Elite 430 PSU: Antec NEO ECO 620W Card Reader: Rosewill RCR-AK-IM5002 CPU HSF: COOLER MASTER HYPER 212 plus
MOBO: GIGABYTE GA-880GA-UD3H AM3 ATX (BIOS: F6) CPU: AMD AM3 Phenom II X3 740 (4th core unlocked, 16.5 x 213 = 3.5Ghz @ 1.392v)
GPU: PNY XLR8 GTX 460 OC 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 (800Mhz Core/1600mhz Shader/1900Mhz Memory) SOUND: Realtek ALC892
DEDICATED PHYSX: Galaxy GT240 512MB GDDR5 (600Mhz Core/1400mhz Shader/1900Mhz Memory) RAM: Mushkin Enhanced Silverline 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3 1333
SSD(OS):
OCZ Agility 2 120GB HDD(STORAGE): SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 1TB KEYBOARD & MOUSE: Logitech Wireless EX 100 Keyboard and Mouse
BURNER: LITE-ON iHBS212 Blu-Ray Burner PLAYER: LITE-ON iHOS104-08 OS: Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit

#10 zkissane

zkissane

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 146 posts

Posted 03 January 2007 - 10:32 AM

Another perspective: If you're talking about computers for other people, give a lot more thought to buying an off-the-shelf PC. Unless you like being someone's go-to computer guy, don't build them a PC.

Personally, I hate working on other people's machines. It seems like the problem they have is only the tip of the iceberg. And after you fix their problem (which often takes twice as long as you expected it to), and you tell them "don't do X unless you want to do this all over again", a month goes by and you're back in front of it and it has the same problem.

#11 85Dave

85Dave

    New Member

  • Members
  • 34 posts

Posted 03 January 2007 - 10:41 AM

building it is not that hard, and you have the assurance of quality parts.

Anyone notice that most prebuild pc's have the 24pin psu plug but the oem only give the psu that has 20pins only?


yea building a computer isn't hard at all...its just near impossible to get the parts checked off the list for what you want to do.

I've been thinking of building a gaming computer...something better than the dell XPS series units but at a lower cost.

the XPS i was going to get was the $1,000 unit but building seems to have gotten me up to about $1,300 minus shipping from newegg so far.

either way, i need a new computer, my other one is starting to die on me.

#12 iamkoza

iamkoza

    Geek

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 808 posts

Posted 03 January 2007 - 11:11 AM

yea building a computer isn't hard at all...its just near impossible to get the parts checked off the list for what you want to do.

I've been thinking of building a gaming computer...something better than the dell XPS series units but at a lower cost.

the XPS i was going to get was the $1,000 unit but building seems to have gotten me up to about $1,300 minus shipping from newegg so far.

either way, i need a new computer, my other one is starting to die on me.


i'm guessing the 1300 DIY computer u picked out is a lot better performer than what you had picked from dell.