Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
accuracy001

Wireless Router Connected to a Wired Router?

Recommended Posts

I have a wired network in my house for our PC's. But we also have a few laptops that we'd like to make wireless.

 

So i was wondering if I could connect a new Wireless Router onto a Wired Router, which is already connected to a cable modem?

 

 

anyhelp would be cool.

thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should be able to SNAT from one router to another. The destination remains the same and when a packet comes back, it comes through both routers and NAT'ed back to the original sender.

 

I suppose you'd set the gateway of the wireless router manually to the first router, and the first router would have it's own gateway from DHCP (to your ISP). That way all computers eventually go out through the wired router.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't see why not. I have two routers/Vonage adapters attached to my wireless/wired router without a problem. You can run one router off one connection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The main router (Wired) should be hooked up to the WAN (DSL or Cable) and from there plug in the second router (wireless) to one of the ethernet ports (doesn't matter which one). If you have different wireless speeds on the laptops (one is 11mbps and other 54mbps) make sure you have Mixed enabled instead of one speed factor. Also try Channel 6 before any other channels, works wonders, good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

does it matter what kind of cable I need to use to connect the wireless to the wired router?

 

Or do i just use the standard CAT5

 

 

and what is a crossover cable for?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The main router (Wired) should be hooked up to the WAN (DSL or Cable) and from there plug in the second router (wireless) to one of the ethernet ports (doesn't matter which one). If you have different wireless speeds on the laptops (one is 11mbps and other 54mbps) make sure you have Mixed enabled instead of one speed factor. Also try Channel 6 before any other channels, works wonders, good luck!

 

Just like he said.

 

Use cat5 or cat6 to connect router to router or router to PC. Crossover cables are only used to directly connect PC to PC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The main router (Wired) should be hooked up to the WAN (DSL or Cable) and from there plug in the second router (wireless) to one of the ethernet ports (doesn't matter which one). If you have different wireless speeds on the laptops (one is 11mbps and other 54mbps) make sure you have Mixed enabled instead of one speed factor. Also try Channel 6 before any other channels, works wonders, good luck!

 

 

Mack is absolutely right. PLEASE make sure you check to see if you have different operating speeds because if your Wired Router is differnt non-compatible speed as your laptop, the different frequencies will not be able to connect your computer to the existing Access Point.

 

To answer your question, a regular Ethernet Cable should be fine, as long as your not using like super fast Giga Ethernet Speeds. Cat 5 should do the job.

 

Cross Over Cable? hmm...have to look into this before I speak though. If it is another cable other than the Ethernet to connect your Wired Router, I'm not sure why its needed because you will already be connecting the other router via Ethernet cable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this goes a bit more in depth about the subject;

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crossover_cable

 

"...Ethernet crossover cable is a type of network cable used to connect computing devices together directly where they would normally be connected via a network switcher, hub or router. The 10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX ethernet standards utilize one wire pair for transmission in each direction. The Tx+ line from each device connects to the tip conductor and the Tx- line is connected to the ring. This requires that the transmit pair of each device be connected to the receive pair of the device on the other end. When a terminal device is connected to a switch or hub, this crossover is done internally in the latter. A standard straight through cable is used for this purpose where each pin of the connector on one end is connected to the corresponding pin on the other connector.

 

One terminal device may be connected directly to another without the use of a switch or hub, but in that case the crossover must be done externally in the cable. Since 10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX use pairs 2 and 3, these two pairs must be swapped in the cable. This is a crossover cable. A crossover cable must also be used to connect two internally crossed devices (e.g., two hubs) as the internal crossovers cancel each other out.

 

Because the only difference between the TIA/EIA-568-B T568A and T568B pin/pair assignments are that pairs 2 and 3 are swapped, a crossover cable may be envisioned as a cable with one connector following T568A and the other T568B. Such a cable will work for 10BASE-T or 100BASE-TX. 100BASE-T4 which uses all four pairs requires the other two pairs (1 and 4) to be swapped and also requires the solid/striped within each of those two pairs to be swapped.

 

Many newer Ethernet NICs, switches and hubs automatically apply an internal crossover when necessary. This feature is known by various vendor-specific terms, e.g., Netgear calls it Auto uplink and trade; and other common vendor terms include Auto-MDI/MDI-X, Universal Cable Recognition and Auto Sensing. This eliminates the need for crossover cables, obsoletes the uplink/normal ports and manual selector switches found on many older hubs and switches, and vastly reduces installation errors, especially by non-technical users.

 

Automatic MDI/MDI-X capability is specified in the 1000BASE-T standard, so straight-through cables will work in almost all cases. But it is optional, so a crossover cable is needed if neither of the connected devices supports it (or the function has been disabled). Unlike the crossover cable described above, with only pairs 2 and 3 swapped, a 1000BASE-T crossover cable also has pairs 1 and 4 swapped..."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The main router (Wired) should be hooked up to the WAN (DSL or Cable) and from there plug in the second router (wireless) to one of the ethernet ports (doesn't matter which one). If you have different wireless speeds on the laptops (one is 11mbps and other 54mbps) make sure you have Mixed enabled instead of one speed factor. Also try Channel 6 before any other channels, works wonders, good luck!

 

How would I do "channel 6" . What do you mean by that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How would I do "channel 6" . What do you mean by that?

The manual will describe how to change the channels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When you access your router control panel (usually 192.168.0.1), there should be an option to change the channel used to transmit the signal. Both the router and the PC have to be set up to use the same channel, 6 is usually set by default.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...