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OtisN89

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Guest Timmay

He may be talking about the 3800 single core?

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Thanks for the advice. I looked at those PSUs and they're expensive, does anyone know of any that may be slightly less expensive.

I probably will wait a little while if prices are going to drop that soon.

As for caffinejunkies suggestion of an Opteron 165 and 2bgs of ram, that may also be too expensive for me, especially the Opteron as it costs more than twice what the 3800+ does.

 

Youre gonna have to pay for quality in the PSU department. Also what are you going to be using it for? Gaming or work?

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Thanks for the advice. I looked at those PSUs and they're expensive, does anyone know of any that may be slightly less expensive.

I probably will wait a little while if prices are going to drop that soon.

As for caffinejunkies suggestion of an Opteron 165 and 2bgs of ram, that may also be too expensive for me, especially the Opteron as it costs more than twice what the 3800+ does.

they are recommended for a reason

 

trying to cheap out on a psu will get you into trouble with DFI Lanparty NF4 / ATI boards

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OtisN89

 

welcomeani.gif

To DFI-Street

 

Every time I turn around I see another person from PA at the Street.

 

Are you gamming? Are you overclocking?

 

 

As far as your PSU it is one of the most important components of your rig. Do yourself and your motherboard a big favor and think about a differant PSU. If you can swing the initial investment get one from the Recommended PSU list that SeanDude05 provided.

 

For your rig this is a slightly cheaper PSU and a great PSU. OCZ 520W

 

 

Stability is the name of the game. PSU can disrupt so many things in ones rig. The stability can go at 1st, which then gets worse and worse as time goes on. Then major power issues with the motherboard and it will seem stability related. Components can also fail or seem to cause stability issues. Basically the PSU is slowly dying and may take your motherboard and or components with it. A PSU failing can happen all of a sudden or slowly over time.

 

Power requirement for DFI motherboards are very high. A good quality PSU with all the power connectors plugged in will make a world of difference in stability and overclocking.

 

PSU Brands to Avoid

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Thanks for the advice. If its that important I don't mind spending the money on a PSU. I did mean the single core 3800, It costs about $150, sorry about the confusion. I do plan to play games, Counter Strike and such, I might overclock it slightly, but not too extreme. The case I'm planning on is a server case with 6 fans so i don't think heat will be a problem.

 

I just changed the parts in the signature based on your suggestions. Upgraded RAM and PSU.

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then the 600w GX psu is definitely recommended. You can't go wrong with it, and you will NEVER have to worry about it being a problem powering your rig.

 

If I could suggest going with OCZ PC4000 (there are 3 different types of 2x1GB PC4000 OCZ modules)...only because we have 3 OCZ reps in this forum and I along with a very large number of users here have OCZ modules...so it makes any issues you might have much easier to solve.

 

Corsair makes great memory, but they have a zillion different model lines, and no reps here, and only a fraction of the user-base that OCZ has.

 

And honestly...Corsair's memory uses the same chips and pcb's as OCZ, Gskill, Mushkin, etc. THere is just no difference in anyone's modules these days, so you need to be choosing based on what kind of support you can get....and you will not find any better support than OCZ, nor will you find many entries in teh Stock Speed Database and Overclocking Database for Corsair like you will OCZ (hell...50% or more of my entries are OCZ memory lol).

 

The other important thing to remember is that 90% of all users that come in saying they didn't really plan on overclocking end up overclocking because after reading around this forum, they see that it is really not that hard, and most users instantly get about 300-500Mhz cpu increases, and that makes them confident enough to try for more, to try their vid card clocking, try new cooling, etc.

 

It also makes them more interested in learning exactly how all of us are achieving crazy overclocks, and so they are more apt to study the OC Guide stuck to the top of the AMD - Overclocking section...which in turn means they will put entries in teh OC Database...which in turn means you will be a good member here who will hopefully stick around to guide other noobs through the process and to assure them that you too were once a noob and with all the great info here it is really not all that hard to buy a $150 cpu and get performance out of it that is equal to the $1000 cpu version ;)

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what HG is describing is what is happening to me. a few months ago i was a noob to OCing. since then i got interested thanx to this forum. it really isnt that hard. this the resources here are about the best you could find anywhere.

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I looked into PC 4000 RAM and I noticed that on the product info page for the Ultra-D, on DFI's website, it doesn't even list DDR 500 as supported. But if you click the "Recomended RAM for Overclocking" link it lists DDR 500 and many others. So I guess what I'm saying is, "Whats up with that?"

 

And I don't know about all that overclocking and doing the vid card, and reading the guides, and helping noobs. I mean how about I order the stuff first and build it. Don't get ahead of your self. ;)

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I looked into PC 4000 RAM and I noticed that on the product info page for the Ultra-D, on DFI's website, it doesn't even list DDR 500 as supported. But if you click the "Recomended RAM for Overclocking" link it lists DDR 500 and many others. So I guess what I'm saying is, "Whats up with that?"

 

And I don't know about all that overclocking and doing the vid card, and reading the guides, and helping noobs. I mean how about I order the stuff first and build it. Don't get ahead of your self. ;)

Well simply put, DDR500 is (pretty much) = to DDR400, except 1 thing, it has been tested to run at much higher speeds. So the various companies Re-bin existing RAM that was once labeled PC3200 to PC4000, and then sell it with the gaurentee(?) that the RAM will run at the stated speeds with the advertised timing's as tested by the technician's working for them.

 

:note: this is meant to be as simple an explanation as possible so don't start flaming me

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I looked into PC 4000 RAM and I noticed that on the product info page for the Ultra-D, on DFI's website, it doesn't even list DDR 500 as supported. But if you click the "Recomended RAM for Overclocking" link it lists DDR 500 and many others. So I guess what I'm saying is, "Whats up with that?"

 

And I don't know about all that overclocking and doing the vid card, and reading the guides, and helping noobs. I mean how about I order the stuff first and build it. Don't get ahead of your self. ;)

I think the fact that we all recommend some PC4000 RAM sorta tells you that just because something isn't listed on some official website doesn't mean it isn't the right part/piece for you....right?

 

If we had to rely on totally 100% officially tested hardware...you'd have a choice of like 15 different memory modules, 5 video cards, 5 power supplies, and 10 cpu's.

 

Nothing else

 

we have communities like this so you can ask people what is good and known to work and then have those people tell you what is good and what works (or else you wouldn't have posted in this section...yeah?)

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