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xynder

Problem overclocking

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I am currently trying to find my CPU's max. This is what I have my stuff set to currently:

 

 

RAM on a huge divider (running at DDR200 to take it out of the question)

LDT Multiplier 2.5x (so this gives me an effective value of... 2.5x312x2 = 1560)

HTT Frequency 312x9 (2800 or so Mhz)

 

 

When I try to raise my HTT to anything over 313 or so, the computer won't get past the Windows boot screen (either that, or it just displays a blank screen or resets after the BIOS info screen).

 

I have tried raising my Vcore from 1.35 (default) up to 1.4, and this has not helped.

 

Have I reached my CPU's max Mhz? Temps are around 36 idle...

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Guest GripS

You don't expect beyond a 1ghz increase without raising the vcore beyond 1.4v do you?

 

36C idle is pretty warm. You might check your temps after 15 minutes of running 2 instances of prime95. If your getting beyond 55C then your cooling is lacking.

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Try 150 divider. Most 165 processors won't work on anything lower at high HTT. Also set DRAM response time to normal and MAL/RP to auto. And raise VCORE.

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I agree with GripS and Praz and lets us know. I am curious. What was the Max FSB of your board before trying to OC your CPU?

 

Your idle should be between 28 and 32. What kind of cooler?

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I agree with GripS and Praz and lets us know. I am curious. What was the Max FSB of your board before trying to OC your CPU?

 

Your idle should be between 28 and 32. What kind of cooler?

 

 

 

The max FSB of my board? What do you mean by that?

 

Anyways, I'm using an Arctic Cooler Freezer 64 PRO. Before doing any overclocking, it idled at about 34-35.

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If you followed the OC guide properly, you would have seen that it is common procedure to find the max htt the board can do.

To do this, drop you multiplier down to 7x or 8x, and then raise the htt as high as it can go (while you know the actual clock is stable) before things start to fail.

 

2.8ghz on 1.4v is slightly below normal for that chip, but it's still great. I can get 2.9ghz at 1.45v with mine, but my idle temps are 33-35 and load at 49 then which is too hot, so I leave it at 2.8ghz.

I'll push for 3.0ghz when it's winter, but it's just too hot right now.

If he's in Arizona, it's hot there right? You have no chance of getting 28-32 degrees if the environment is too hot. It's like 30 degrees in France right now... Don't worry about your idle temps, they're ok, just keep the load under 50, even if it means sacrificing clockspeed.

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If you followed the OC guide properly, you would have seen that it is common procedure to find the max htt the board can do.

To do this, drop you multiplier down to 7x or 8x, and then raise the htt as high as it can go (while you know the actual clock is stable) before things start to fail.

 

2.8ghz on 1.4v is slightly below normal for that chip, but it's still great. I can get 2.9ghz at 1.45v with mine, but my idle temps are 33-35 and load at 49 then which is too hot, so I leave it at 2.8ghz.

I'll push for 3.0ghz when it's winter, but it's just too hot right now.

If he's in Arizona, it's hot there right? You have no chance of getting 28-32 degrees if the environment is too hot. It's like 30 degrees in France right now... Don't worry about your idle temps, they're ok, just keep the load under 50, even if it means sacrificing clockspeed.

 

 

 

I didn't see anything in the guide about how to find your mobo's max HTT. Can anyone help?

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Ok, maybe it's not there.

It's easy enough though:

Drop your cpu multiplier to 6x instead, set your vcore at 1.4v (as you know you're stable up to 2.8ghz so there will be no problem), set your ram on a fat divider, and raise your htt in 10mhz increments, and then stress it out.

This way your htt will be able to go way over 400 (and it will crap out beore then) before your clockspeed will go above 2.8ghz, ie, your cpu will be stable

Because you know that you cpu and ram are stable, as soon as problems arise, you know it's because your motherboard cannot handle that much htt.

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