Jump to content

SVC coollaboratory Liquid Pro Thermal interface material


thefabe

Recommended Posts

SVC sent me this thought I'd pass it on says has 8 times the thermal transfer as Artic Silver 5 of course it is pure metal so extreme care is required http://store.yahoo.com/cgi-bin/clink?svcom...Fb+coolab.html+ please use the DFI's yahoo link when purchasing Thanks also if you read thru the articale it says Not to be used with aluminum coolers must be copper or silver.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone please try this, I would like to hear some firsthand Street accounts of how it works.

 

This is some scary stuff though! It's thermal properties are outa this world, but that is becasue it is METAL, straight up, and last time I checked very conductive, of heat and electricity. To anyone who is woundering, no it is not Mercery, it looks like it but it is actully a Gallium mixture, one of the few; including Mercery, Caesium, Francium, and Rubidium; that is liquid at room temps. It eats aluminum right infront of your eyes, also likes to eat steel, and corrodes almost all other metals (think copper, and whatever the IHS is on your CPU). It is tough to apply since it likes to just roll around instead of spread. Now if someone could make a pump that could move it efectivelly you could replace water in a water loop with Gallium, it conducts heat about 65 times better than water!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I should have some tomorrow. I have my doubts about its performance but it wont be the first time I've wasted some money. Hopefully it will not eat my Storm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It eats aluminum right infront of your eyes, also likes to eat steel, and corrodes almost all other metals (think copper, and whatever the IHS is on your CPU).

 

best do some research before claiming this

 

heatspreaders on cpu's are made of steel or a combination of hard metals, not copper and not silver

 

I doubt seriously they'd sell this to ya if it ate through a steel IHS on an Intel/AMD cpu...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ouch lol

 

too bad it is in french =(

 

but

 

it seems that it does not like aluminum too much lol (sorta like muratic acid for swimming pools! that stuff will eat aluminum in an instant)

 

 

looks like it does no damage to copper though...which is good...and steel...which is also good ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok you take the risk. But it does react with steel. One of the main ingredients is Gallium..."Gallium metal expands by 3.1 percent when it solidifies, and therefore should not be stored in either glass or metal containers, as they may break as the metal solidifies. Gallium also corrodes most other metals by diffusing into their metal lattice. It is very important to keep gallium away from any type of metal containers such as steel or aluminum." I have also seen this stuff in the Chem lab at ISU, it loves to corrod most anything. While it might be a very good substitute to AS5 I wouldn't risk it. Let's see some long term and short term results from users here at the street. Or some long term results from anywhere.

 

BTW, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gallium, that is where the quote is from.

 

"Gallium readily alloys with most metals...">http://www.scescape.net/~woods/elements/gallium.html , http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele031.html , http://www.lenntech.com/Periodic-chart-elements/Ga-en.htm

 

Beware of two other things... One, if it doesn't eat your IHS and heatsinks it could "weld" the two together. This stuff has other things in it that might help slow this process, but it still could.

 

Two, this stuff is condutive, very conductive. Gallium is used in LED's and if you flow a current through pure Gallium it will produce light. This stuff I believe has other stuff in it so don't try it at home unless it is pure. If any leaks out or even a little bit get acidently smeard on a PCB of any kind, motherboard, GFX card, etc..., I could and will short it out.

 

So if you want to try it, use with caution. You should not only look around at reviews of this compund, but also research the chemical make up of this stuff. It may not be, but it does have the potential of being dangerous.

 

I have seen corrosion on steel caused by Gallium, and I have seen first hand as it ate alumminum. This stuff isn't pure Gallium, but it does contain it, I am sure that it has something to slow or stop some of the corrosion, and it has to have something to help it solidify. I have not had experiance with this product first hand, but I have with some the ingredients. Just keep this in mind, I am not an expert, I just don't want anyone to see this stuff and let the results cloud their vision, when the only results I have seen are on review sites, adn even then I have seen like 4, 2 of which for sure are in German.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pure Gallium could be adopted as a cooling method though. If you can find a pump to move it then it would work. I has been suggested before (it is brought up on the Wikipedia page), because it is a metal, it transfers heat 65 times better than water. There are a lot of problems to overcome though; it has a high thermal transfer rate, but it is corrosive, it is kinda pricey, it is highly conductive...bla bla bla, you know by my last post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...