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Can RAM Timings be limiting an oc?

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So I've recently read that despite putting RAM on a 100 Divider, it won't take RAM completely out of the picture when finding CPU max. I belive I read that someone couldn't get past 2.6 no matter what volts to the CPU or what divider, but when changed the RAM timings from CAS2 to CAS3, got a much higher OC to 2.9...

 

Is this true? For finding CPU max would you suggest CAS3 (or even 2T) in addition to setting it on the 100 divider?

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So I've recently read that despite putting RAM on a 100 Divider, it won't take RAM completely out of the picture when finding CPU max. I belive I read that someone couldn't get past 2.6 no matter what volts to the CPU or what divider, but when changed the RAM timings from CAS2 to CAS3, got a much higher OC to 2.9...

 

Is this true? For finding CPU max would you suggest CAS3 (or even 2T) in addition to setting it on the 100 divider?

 

It dont matter because what you are trying to do is find the cpu max. What it means to take ram out of the equation is to run it at its lowest possible setting, that way you know that its not the ram that is causing stability problem when trying to OC the cpu. Now if that cpu, with ram set at its lowest setting, is unstable at a certain speed at a certain vcore you are willing to run it, then you will have found the limit of that cpu and to find stability on that cpu, you either increase vcore or decrease speed if your vcore is already at a setting that is too high for your liking. The hardest part of OC'ing is finding the right stable setting of the ram that is determined by your htt and there are so many ways to do it that it is explained at the guide. Now this is where the OCDB comes in to play because I am pretty sure 90% of the OC'ing ram have been used and users have found a stable setting for a particular ram. That is also the reason why I choose to use DDR500 memory to ease the headache a bit for its OC'ing potential.

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It dont matter because what you are trying to do is find the cpu max. What it means to take ram out of the equation is to run it at its lowest possible setting, that way you know that its not the ram that is causing stability problem when trying to OC the cpu.

 

Exactly, thats what I'm asking, does the RAM's "lowest setting" include going 2T and CAS3, because many guides just tell you to do the 100 divider.

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So I've recently read that despite putting RAM on a 100 Divider, it won't take RAM completely out of the picture when finding CPU max. I belive I read that someone couldn't get past 2.6 no matter what volts to the CPU or what divider, but when changed the RAM timings from CAS2 to CAS3, got a much higher OC to 2.9...

 

Is this true? For finding CPU max would you suggest CAS3 (or even 2T) in addition to setting it on the 100 divider?

 

Sure, RAM certainly can affect your highest OC even on a divider. Running RAM at cas2 200mhz puts about as much stress on your CPU mem controller as running it at cas 2.5 240-250mhz.

 

I've found that different RAM running at stock mhz can also limit max OC. For example, on one set of sticks at stock I couldn't do 2.7 - on another I could. I think Drive Strength comes into play, but I haven't had a chance to prove that one way or another.

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