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Raid 5

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I have not come across any guides on creating a Raid 5 with the Silicon Image. I want to use three 300GB SATA Drives in a Raid 5. Looking at the sticky for creating raids on here I did not see the option for Raid 5 but DFI specs shows it as a feature. Any light on this would be great.

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I did look look at the manual and I still do not see any mention of Raid 5.

 

It states "RAID 0, RAID 1, and RAID 10 Sets are supported"

 

But DFI shows:

Serial ATA with RAID

Four Serial ATA ports supported by the nForce4 SLI chip

- SATA speed up to 3Gb/s

- RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 0+1 and JBOD

- NVIDIA RAID allows RAID arrays spanning across Serial ATA and Parallel ATA

Four Serial ATA ports supported by the Silicon Image Sil 3114 chip

- SATA speed up to 1.5Gb/s

- RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 0+1 and RAID 5

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Let me ask you a simple question:

 

What does this look like?

 

Sil3114RAID5Page1.jpg

 

Now, do you want to download that manual and start reading?

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I played with Raid 5 a little and did not get manual in retail box. When doing fresh install of XP I had to select the first two drivers on floppy that say REQUIRED then the one for raid 5 and it worked. Hope this helps.

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if you want RAID5, forget using the integrated onboard controller. With 3 Raptor 10,000RPM drives, the best I could manage was 16MB/s read/write scores.

 

Yes, that is 16MB per second read and write with all 3 drives together (and about 15MB/s with 3 80GB Hitachi SATA II drives but of course the SI3114 does not support SATA II so you are stuck at SATA I transfers which don't make a whit of difference anyway).

 

compare to 3x80GB Hitachi SATA II and 3x36GB Raptor in RAID-1 and RAID-0, using RAID-5 is akin to watching latex paint slowly dry on a damp, cold day.

 

If you never listen to anyone's advice ever again after this bit of advice, at least you listened to this bit of advice: for real RAID5, you will be required to purchase a rather expensive PCI or PCI-E card that can handle such a task, but trying to use the integrated onboard SI3114 controller for RAID-5 is about as wise as sniffing muratic acid (stuff used to balance PH in swimming pools...and it will eat holes in concrete and dissolve aluminum so that should give you a pretty instant clue exactly how bright that would be)

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Sir, I am going to give you the benefit of the doubt on this and believe that maybe, just maybe, you have overlooked something....

 

I have the downloaded and am viewing it right now.

 

The last selection on the list I am seeing for the SLI-DR Expert is this:

 

Sil3114downloadpageforExpert.jpg

 

I am viewing the manual in Adobe Acrobat Reader right now:

 

SIL3114viewinginAcrobat.jpg

 

Do not tell me I sent you the wrong manual for that is not the case.

 

I asked you to download the last manual on the list for which apparently you have not done.

 

Please pay closer attention to what people are asking you do. Doing so will prevent situations like this.

 

After reading the manual, if you find that you still have questions pertaining to setting-up a RAID-5 array, I will be happy to answer them. :)

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if you want RAID5, forget using the integrated onboard controller. With 3 Raptor 10,000RPM drives, the best I could manage was 16MB/s read/write scores.

 

Yes, that is 16MB per second read and write with all 3 drives together (and about 15MB/s with 3 80GB Hitachi SATA II drives but of course the SI3114 does not support SATA II so you are stuck at SATA I transfers which don't make a whit of difference anyway).

 

compare to 3x80GB Hitachi SATA II and 3x36GB Raptor in RAID-1 and RAID-0, using RAID-5 is akin to watching latex paint slowly dry on a damp, cold day.

 

If you never listen to anyone's advice ever again after this bit of advice, at least you listened to this bit of advice: for real RAID5, you will be required to purchase a rather expensive PCI or PCI-E card that can handle such a task, but trying to use the integrated onboard SI3114 controller for RAID-5 is about as wise as sniffing muratic acid (stuff used to balance PH in swimming pools...and it will eat holes in concrete and dissolve aluminum so that should give you a pretty instant clue exactly how bright that would be)

 

so raid 5 is bad on si3114? :)

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Setting-up a RAID 5 array on the Sil3114 controler with SATA II drives will not garner a person the full possible performance that could be obtained on a SATA II controller.

 

Even more so, people have been reported poor SATA performance from the Sil3114 controller for quite awhile.

 

But, he asked for assistance in creating a RAID 5 controller and we are abliged to help him. :)

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RAID 5 requires the generation of parity data created by XORing. On expensive RAID controllers you will get a dedicated CPU +RAM on the card for generating this data . (Intel i960's used to be popular for this).

 

Without a dedicated CPU your main CPU needs to do this = greater I/O traffic and CPU load.

 

RAID 5 is great for servers but less so for desktops. If you want redundancy run RAID 1. We use RAID 5 on the servers at work but they use SCSI U320 Fibre Channel drives for the array :drool:

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Does the NF4 chipset SATA controller support RAID5? It is listed as an available option in the RAID utility at boot-up and inside the MediaSheild utility in windows. However I have yet to get a RAID5 array working properly. System blue screens.

 

Thanks,

Mike

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RAID-5 is pretty complicated. Quite honestly I wouldn't trust a Silicon Image software to get it right.

 

As Angry said, performance will also be low, but more importantly, all of the onboard "RAID" controllers have a severe problem in that parts of the RAID software are in the BIOS (so that you can boot off the array) and parts in OS drivers (because the whole thing is too complicated to put into the BIOS).

 

For example, I have seen a good number of reports where recovery after drive failure would not work right if a reboot was attempted while one drive was half-broken, the BIOS part would wreck the data on the good disk(s) instead.

 

Personally I only use pure software raid and don't boot from it, but I don't know know where and how to get that for Windows.

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