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Mako3

Qualifying PSU for the Ultra-D

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Yah thanks, its a really though choice but I dunno if I'm going to get $300 for my HP which I listed a link above, but like I really really want to run my new build and it only needs a new PSU and maybe new ram, but like I was talking with a guy on aim whois on this forum he has this crappy PSU: http://www.computermodshop.com/?action=8874-0339 and he ran : cpu 3500*+ mobo ultra d. 6600gt ram 5 80mm fans not including the 120 on psu and 80mm on psu and gfx card all on it for quite sometime, and he said he never had a problem, including running cs source.

 

This is like the toughest decision I have ever had to think about.

 

-Mako3

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...and he ran : cpu 3500*+ mobo ultra d. 6600gt ram 5 80mm fans not including the 120 on psu and 80mm on psu and gfx card all on it for quite sometime, and he said he never had a problem, including running cs source.

 

All I can say, Mako, is what being involved with computers since the 70's has taught me - a cheap PSU is an accident waiting to happen. Every time you throw that power switch is like pulling the trigger in Russian Roulet. Most times you will get away with it, but it only takes one shot to ruin your whole day.

 

And that's all I have to say about that. :D

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One fried motherboard and video card is all it takes to make the decision very easy. Fortunatly I learned that lesson from someone else and not from personal experience though I have had PSU's burn out it. Even for me without fried parts it would have ben cheaper to get the correct part the first time and not pay twice for the same part.

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Thanks guys, yah I know what you guys are saying but what would you guys do, if you guys owed your Dad $100, in debt with bank $10, and had no money hoping that your hp pavilion 522c would sell for atleast $300, and have your whole new build assembled but knowing that your PSU couldnt cut it, but people with worse PSUs have been able to get it to work but you dont want to take the risk on getting ur mobo fried and possibly more.

 

I really hope that Angry can help out on this since he knows which PSUs are good for the DFI mobos inside out. Im taking everyones advice into consideration but this is such a tough spot being in, and Ive been slacking in school so my parents wont let me have a job untill summer and I dont want to wait that long till I get a new PSU.

 

-Mako3

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Cut corners at your peril.

 

We've been working these motherboards for almost two years.

 

Buy off the approved list because we know they work.

 

Look at the power supplies listed in the sigs of happy forum members.

 

Pay attention to the recommendations of the DFI engineers. They designed the board so they should know.

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Thanks guys, yah I know what you guys are saying but what would you guys do, if you guys owed your Dad $100, in debt with bank $10, and had no money hoping that your hp pavilion 522c would sell for atleast $300, and have your whole new build assembled but knowing that your PSU couldnt cut it, but people with worse PSUs have been able to get it to work but you dont want to take the risk on getting ur mobo fried and possibly more.

 

I would still wait until I could afford a quality PSU. Just because someone else hasn't had troubles with a cheap PSU doesn't mean a thing to be honest. The rule of thumb I use in PSU consideration is to add up what all parts of the build cost and then pay, at a bare minimum, 10% of the build cost on a PSU. The PSU powers everything in your system, going cheap is just an accident waiting to happen. Not to mention a good quality PSU will last for years. Cheap PSU's generally have a life of about 2yrs, even less in some instances.

 

The current system in my sig was about a years worth of squirelling money away so that I had exactly what I'd need for now as well as some future expandability.

 

You can pick up good quality PSU's pretty cheap if you look around. Personally I recommend, from most expensive to least, PC Power and Cooling, OCZ, Enermax, Fortron and Sparkle.

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Thanks guys, yah I know what you guys are saying but what would you guys do, if you guys owed your Dad $100, in debt with bank $10, and had no money hoping that your hp pavilion 522c would sell for atleast $300, and have your whole new build assembled but knowing that your PSU couldnt cut it, but people with worse PSUs have been able to get it to work but you dont want to take the risk on getting ur mobo fried and possibly more.

 

Complete Dell desktops start at $300, brand new, with monitor and accessories...and probably better performance. You should try to be more realistic about the price you can expect out of your machine...at least if you are motivated to sell soon.

 

From a business perspective, honestly, I would keep your good "core" components - mobo, CPU, and sell everything else (your ram, your old power supply, etc). Put all of the money in the bank and collect a few months interest. Then complete your system when the new AMD sockets and DDR2 support come out, and the prices on S939/DDR products start coming down.

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I have used the Skyhawk 520 watt for a month in my system and found it to be a quiet and reliable PSU. I was able to get a few more Mhz out of my OC when I upgraded to the OCZ Powerstream 520. Check the recommended PSU thread and save yourself some future grief.

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