Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
haplopeart

Dual Lan Connections why?

Recommended Posts

Ok,

 

So I bought my board for other reasons, now that I have the system up and fairly stable (observations on that coming in a later post) I am looking at the dual NICs and wondering why?

 

They are differnet makers with different drivers so you can't take advantage of bonding to raise available bandwidth.

 

If configured on the same subnet windows will always prefer one NIC over the other for routing traffic basically making the other unused.

 

On different subnets I suppose that they might get some use from having different routes and gateways. But who really segments a home lan like that?

 

So I ask has anyone found a use for two NICS? Am I missing something, or is just what I think a big marketing gimmick?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

almost every motherboard these days comes with 2 ethernet ports...i still have not found a use for the other one of them :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they are both gigabit and there are lots of potential uses.

 

You can connect to 2 different networks with them. One can be for internet, and the other for a secured home network. You don't have to worry about someone getting onto your home network through your internet connection that way. I doubt anyone would actually have a setup like that.

 

One nice use for it is if you're on a router that doesn't have enough free ethernet ports. You can hook up a pc into your open port and bridge the 2 lan connections. I've actually had a chain of 3 PCs coming from a single ethernet port on a router. Of course this isn't a great idea because as soon as you reboot or shutdown, everyone below you on the chain loses connectivity. Not to mention you're all sharing the same bandwidth from the router.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can be nice to have an ADSL connection via a 100mb ADSL router, and a direct 1gb connection to your NAS server.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always thought you could connect both to a gigabit switch and bridge the two lan connections. Wouldnt you be connected at 2 Gbps to the local network lol? Would only really increase transfers on your home network because your cable/dsl modem is a bottle neck usually around 1.5 - 3 Mbps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

incorrect - bridging it will not increase bandwidth. You will need 2 NICs that support bonding, and even then they would have to be the same make/model (or at least the same make anyways, depending on how the manufacturer designed their products).

 

Intel and 3Coms are big on this. And usually they are on the more expensive server-level NICs (costs around 50-100 bucks each).

 

 

The bridging in XP Home/Pro allows for 2 dissimilar networks to communicate. So that means sharing an internet connection, or bridging two local subnets together so that the two different networks can communicate with each other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...