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Storage for Music help please [email protected]!


OceanSeasforMe
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Ok, I know people have a better than average IQ here (IMHO) so this is the place I ask my newbie questions.

 

So a friend came by and dropped off a CD collection and I need to get 50 + CD’s stored on a computer. My intel rig has a 20 gig partition on the 160 that I want to use as a permastorage / master and burn selections from it.

 

So what is the best (program / format) for me to use to do this? I don’t mind a bare bones program if it has the right power tools.

 

Also, If anyone has a guestimate of how much storage space 100+ music CD’s would take that would be nice. Cause I might as well add my 50 CD’s as well.

 

I always just popped a CD in if I want to hear it and I have all music capture turned off, so this is my first foray into mp3 storage and burning land ever.

 

I have a burner for everything I just haven’t done this before. I guess I will fiddle with Nero Express, Real player, I tunes or Media Player 10 and see if I can wing it to store them as mp3’s.

 

I just do not want to get them trapped in a proprietary format for one particular player. (These will go in a car stereo also in case that matters.)

 

If you have any favorite methods programs or tips I would appreciate the feedback.

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Here is a link to a pretty cool free program, CDBurnerXPPro .

With it you can rip your cds to mp3, wma, or ogg , burn your cds, and data disks.

 

There is a forum there that may help some too.http://www.cdburnerxp.se/forum/

 

It allows you to rip mp3s at various bitrates too, 320 is great quality but eats up more space, 192 has good sound quality.

Depending on the cd,and the bitrate used, probably between 50 and 100mb space per cd.

 

Check it out, and don't hesitate with any questions.

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I usually use EAC - Exact Audio Copy;

 

Link to EAC Site

 

It's one of the most accurate rippers out there, and is well-respected by "audio" people. It is great at error correction, and can be set up to be very simple or very complex, depending on your needs.

 

One nice thing is that it supports CDDB, and can automatically find and import song tags automatically. There's also a tag editor for manual entry.

 

There's much more info at the site!

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I use CDex, you can download it free here from Download.com. It's not a jukebox program, I use it simply for ripping. http://www.download.com/CDex/3000-2140_4-10226370.html

 

It uses freedb lookup and you can also submit to freedb.

 

It can rip to most formats if you like. Best format would be constant bitrate MP3. MP3 is very common now and some programs have trouble with variable bitrate. I've never had any trouble with anything I've ever ripped with CDex. And believe me, I've come across quite a few MP3s that I got from other people that gave some programs trouble. Mostly "Secured" files and things they downloaded. Use at least 192 kbps if you want good quality sound, with this you will get around 10 CDs per gig.

 

You can preset different filename formats, like Artist/Album/Track #/Track Name for single artist discs and Album/Track #/Artist/Track Name for various artist discs. A lot of programs won't recognize, and seperate the filename with the individual artists for various artist discs. Windows Media Player won't let you use " - " as a seperator, you are stuck with "-" without the spaces. CDex is more flexible with naming. It lets you substitute characters from freedb with characters of your choice. This comes in handy when you have a "?" at the end of a title. Some other programs will automatically insert a space instead of special characters. This way, it's your choice.

 

It can do normalization, so if you have a disc that's too loud or quiet then it can correct the volume while ripping. It has Jitter Correction that's varible. It's like asking if you want 8X oversampling or 10X.

 

Granted, EAC is better with those damaged discs that nothing else will read. But I use CDex 99% of the time. I have two drives so when I have a bunch of discs I want to rip at once, I open it twice and rip two at a time. One time I threw in a 3rd drive and ripped 3 at a time.

 

Use both id3v1 & id3v2 tags. Some popular programs just use one or the other.

If you burn MP3s to a CD in MP3 format, long file names will get truncated. ID3v1 tags also get truncated naturally while Id3v2 tags will hold the entire name of the field like track name etc. You can use a program like Taggin' MP3 by Lazorsoft to easily rename those tracks using the info contained in the id3v2 tags. You can download that free at Download.com here http://www.download.com/Taggin-MP3/3000-21...tml?tag=lst-0-1

 

Do it right the first time or you will be kicking yourself later. And if you decide to start scanning covers, scan it as Jpeg. Scan them no less than 200 dpi, I suggest 300 dpi. Some scanning software, like HP, doesn't compress them fully. One little trick with compressing jpegs. Open it with Paint and resave "Ctrl+S" and it may compress it to 1/5 the size without losing quality.

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well i read this post different then the rest i guess but i read it as how hes going to store the cds on his hard drive? if thats the ? i like musicmatch myself it will copy your cd format in any format you wont and to the 2? -12 to 14 songs per CD thats 56mb at 100 CDs well that be some weres around 5600MB

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