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BuddTX

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About BuddTX

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  1. Interesting! To check my powersupply (from the OCZ forms): Q: I think my power supply is damaged! How can I check to see if it works? A: The simplest way to check the status of your power supply is to jumpstart it with nothing but a fan or drive connected to it. In some cases, a motherboard may be shorting out on a case mount or something similar and this is causing your power supply not to power on. Jump starting the power supply lets you test it separate from the rest of your system to determine if it is the problem
  2. (I love answering my own questions!) THE SEARCH FUNCTION IS YOUR FRIEND! Look on Page 68 of the Manual! Your power supply unit may come with an 8-pin or 4-pin +12V power connector. The +12V power enables the delivery of more +12VDC current to the processor’s Voltage Regulator Module (VRM). If available, it is preferable to use the 8-pin power; otherwise connect the 4-pin power connector to CN9 as shown below. 8 •• 4 (Use this in you only have one 4 pin connector) 7 •• 3 (Use this in you only have one 4 pin connector) 6 •• 2 (Leave Blank) 5 •• 1 (Leave Blank)
  3. Why yes, Actually I do have another Power Supply! It is actually a 20+4 pin Power Supply: Broadway Com Corp P4-OKIA600-BLACK ATX 600W Power Supply Not in the same class as an OCZ 700w PS, but hey, it just might work. I originally bought this to build a "cheap" 939 system with my leftover parts, but decided to go high end, and this one has never been used. ONE problem, however, this only has one 4pin CPU connector (CPU1) how do I hook this up to an EXPERT motherboard? Is there a 4 to 8 pin converter? Or do I convert a Molex connection?
  4. OK, at this point, I think it is most likely the motherboard. I put in my "virgin" 3000+ chip, and no luck at all, not even a 1-3 second power on-off. I also re-seated the existing Opteron 175 and I had the same result. So, I can either RMA the DFI Expert board, or buy a 939 Motherboard from Newegg. I would love to buy another Expert 939 Motherboard, but I seem to think they are scarce!
  5. I tried keeping the CMOS on CLEAR for like 6 hours, and that did not help. I think I will try putting in a stock 3000+ 939 chip that I have lying around, to see if my Opteron 175 with the IHS removed might be the problem. At this point, I HOPE it is the processor, as I have already voided the warantee by removing the IHS. I have nothing to loose by trying my 3000+ processor. BUT I would appreciate any other suggestions!
  6. I found this thread: troubleshooting - computer turns on for five seconds, then turns off. But it did not help
  7. OK, this is not the system in my SIG. I was building another system, and I was ready for a kick butt system, I had OCZ RAM and OCZ power supply, a DFI Expert Motherboard, an Opteron 175 with the IHS removed, a TR SR-05, a Enzotech Ultra-X HSF, a 7590 Video Card, and a 10,000 RPM Hard drive, and 4 upgraded Silverstone 120mm fans. I was going to be ready for some serious Overclocking. I got everything set up, and added one hard drive, and turned it on, and it booted up to windows perfectly. So, I decided to add my other 3 hard drives, my two DVD Burners, etc, and when I turned on my system, the PC powered up, but it would not boot. After trying to clear the CMOS several times, I figured that some cable might have been unpluged, so I re-checked all the cables. Still no luck. So I disassembled the entire new system, and then re-assembled just the bare minimum components to boot up, and this time, the PC would only power on for 1-3 seconds, before turning off. I tried clearing the CMOS several times, but with no success. So I re-assembled my current pc (listed in my sig). So there was my entire weekend! Any suggestions as to what is wrong? Can I RMA my motherboard back to DFI? Should I even fool with the 939 socket anymore, i mean, I have an Opteron 175, 2 gig of OCZ Platinum Ram, and a DFI Expert Motherboard, that is like 5 or 6 hundred bucks.
  8. Two Suggesions: 1. Use acetone first, then 91% 91 isopropyl alcohol. 2. However, I recommend using Arctic Silver ArctiClean It is cheap, and works fantasticly well. If ArctiClean was expensive, I would be all for acetone and 91% 91 isopropyl alcohol, but man, this stuff is cheap, and works GREAT!
  9. BuddTX

    Build in or real RAID card?

    Most Reliable and stable and fastest is a HARDWARE RAID card. The BIOS and OS sees the RAID as one physical hard drive. Unix, Windows, DOS, Netware, all OS's see the RAID as one drive. You can GHOST a Hardware RAID drive.
  10. I realise this is an older thread but . . . Norton ghost for DOS (7.0, 7.5, 8.2, 11, 2003) will work on any hardware RAID, that is, a RAID that does not need to have any drivers loaded. Software RAIDS are not supported by GHOST. For more than you ever wanted to know about Ghost: http://radified.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl and http://radified.com/index2.html
  11. I currently use a Thermalright Si-128 (see sig) Seems to do a good job, but I was looking for something better. Building a second system.
  12. This might explain something: Quoted from http://forums.anandtech.com/ ============================================ Synthetic diamond is pretty cheap, especially in the form of powder (small crystals). I'd like to see this stuff tested vs. AS Ceramique and Shin-Etsu X23-7783D, but given Anandtech's stance towards TIM performance, I don't expect to see any such test here. ============================================ What is that? ============================================ Please elaborate??? ============================================ They don't think TIM makes much of a difference at all. Hence the reason if you read the Enzotech Ultra-X review they say they didn't used the AS5 that came with it, but instead their generic crap they use for all coolers. ============================================
  13. BuddTX

    Plasma vs. LCD?

    I have been researching this for years, both for myself, and for work, and I think I have some good advice, and observations. First, however, let me tell you what I purchased and why. I walked into Fry's about a month ago, and they had a Panasonic TH-58PX60U 58 inch Plasma on sale for 2199. That was one crazy low price, for what they were selling. It was a 2006 model, no 1080P, but WOW, six months ago this thing was like 5500 bucks or so. I had been researching this for a while, and this was one great deal, on one of the best Plasmas out there. I decided that 1080p was not worth 1500-2000 dollars more at this time, so now I am PLEASED AS PUNCH to be the owner of a Panasonic 58 inch Plasma! So for me, for my living room (or as I call it, my messy Home Theater room!) I choose Plasma. BUT, I will NEVER tell someone else that Plasma is better than LCD, or DLP or whatever. YOU have to make that decision. Just fyi, for ME, a deciding factor between Plasma and LCD was the way that WATER looked, (ocean, lakes, waterfalls, etc). With the Plasmas, the water seemed to look real, whereas with the LCD's the water scenes seemed to look slightly dull. (Not to mention, that a 58 inch LCD is way more expensive than my 58 inch plasma. So, here are some comments: Some people LOVE one format over any other, so be aware of comments from these "biased" enthusiasts. Heck, even companies take sides. Panasonic recently had an article about how Plasma is better, and Sony countered with an article saying that LCD was better: TECHNOLOGY; Forget L.C.D.; Go for Plasma, Says Maker of Both New York Times Now two years ago, I was one of those "Plasma is best" guys. Then I went to an industrial Audio Video show, and got to see both a Plasma and a LCD, same size, side by side, displaying the same PC content. Both had the same video connection, and I was shocked at what I saw. The LCD just BLEW away the Plasma for PC content. the LCD was bright, and vibrant, and crisp, and sharp, whereas the Plasma was weak and anemic by comparision. So, take everyones advice, then decide for yourself. Camp out at Frys etc for hours if necessary, looking at the displays. Now both Plasma camps and LCD camps are constantly improving, so any weakness on one side, is most probably being addressed. LCD PROs - LCD is probably the better choice if: -Your viewing room is bright or has lots of lights. -Your main video source is PC or gaming -You might have lots of static images -You need 1080p -your TV will be on all day every day Plasma Pros - Plasma is probably a better choice if: -Your main viewing source is TV-DVD -You watch lots of sports -Your viewing room is darker or less ambient light. -You want a larger TV I think that, in 2007, if you choose any high quality set, you would be very happy with either format. I did read some comments that said, that with the prices coming down for both Plasma and LCD, the DLP camp might suffer an early death, unless they also lower their prices. Now, some personal comments after setting up my Plasma: Plasmas are HEAVY! My 58 in Plasma was over 100 lbs. Dont confuse thin with lightweight! While I do not have any first hand experience (except for my LCD PC monitors) I have heard that LCDs are much lighter than their Plasma counterparts. Plasmas do get hot, or more accurately, warm. Plasmas use more electricity than LCD's Educate yourself, I spent a lot of time at AVSforum.com. I thought I was 6 months to a year away from purchasing a widescreen TV when I walked into frys and found my baby! Realise that 4-6 years from now, it will be a completely different ballgame. My next purchase will probably be an LCD for my bedroom, just to let you know that I am not still a "plasma at all costs" guy. At work, I am going to purchase 5 LCD's and 3 Plasmas, and I have specific uses for each one. Now I do have some final thoughts. I am not "made of money", but I purchased three of these : BELKIN F6C1500-TW-RK 1500VA 8 Outlets UPS (One for my Plasma TV, one for the rest of my HT setup, and one for my PC) and two of these: ZeroSurge Surge Protector One for my PC and one for my Home Theater setup. Zerosurge is a completely different type of Surge Protector from almost ANY other type of surge protector. Go to the web site and read about it. I have been hit by lightening once, in 1999, and it was not fun. My Home Owners insurance would have covered my loss, but I had a large deductible, and it was not worth it to put a claim in. I also have comfort in knowing that I am suppling clean and constant power to my expensive A/V and PC equipment. Good luck!
  14. I have been assembling the parts to build a "state of the art" air cooled overclocking PC, and the HSF that I picked was the Enzotech Ultra-X. (Based on positive comments posted here, as well as numerous other rave reviews!) I have not installed the Enzotech yet, but, as others have said, this thing is a "thing of beauty", and the mirrored copper HS finish is very nice, as I do not have to manually "lap" the surface. Also, I am going to replace the built in fan with one of these: YS Tech 120x38mm Fan - 126CFM (FD121238HB) 126 CFM! Thats a lot of air! I the enzotech is 82.67CFM so that is like 44 more CFM! That should cool things down even more! Also, I am not going to hook up any fans to my motherboard, but rather all fans will be connected directly to my OZC power supply. (Again, thanks to everyone here for telling me that you should not hook up high powered fans to the motherboard, it is better to hook them up directly to the power supply. Supposedly the fans get full power, and the motherboards avoid potential damage.) Anyway, the review at anandtech confused me: Enzotech Ultra-X: If Looks Could Chill Here is a quote from the "conclusions" page: =============================== Nothing we have measured in this review of the Enzotech Ultra-X has changed our opinion of the influence of air cooler design on cooler performance. The heatpipe towers with side-facing fans are the top-performing coolers we have tested, in both overclocking ability and cooling efficiency. The best designs with down-facing fans perform in a second tier category just below the top heatpipe towers. The Enzotech Ultra-X performs in that category. That means the top of the air cooler list is still the domain of the Thermalrights, Tuniq Tower 120, and a few push-pull configured towers. ================================ WHAT? All the other reviews I have read raved about the Enzotech. It is certantly not a BAD review, just not the ultra rave reviews that other people and reviews have stated. PLUS I like the concept of a downward blowing fan, as it cools the surrounding motherboard and memory. Well, I am still going to use my enzotech in my system. I figure that my high CFM fans (4, 120mm 125.5 CFM, plus a couple of other fans) , combined with my IHS removal should give me ample cooling. OH, thanks to yall here on diy-street, and my local hardware store, I figured out how to bolt on my hsf and chipset coolers. This will be much better than that stupid clip that comes with the 939 socket. OH, I think others have mentioned this, but I took apart the Enzotech heat sink (see a picture to see what I am talking about) directly over the CPU, cleaned all surfaces with ArticClean, and added some Artic Silver TIM and re-attached the heat sink. Every little bit helps, right!
  15. BuddTX

    Coolit Eliminators at Frys

    I saw them there too! I was looking for the Enzotech Cooler there! I have high hopes that the Enzotech combined with a removed IHS that I can break 3G on my 939 chip!
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