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Wow, really?


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#1 rich1051414

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 11:58 PM

So, apparently I just topped the FireStrike leader board for users with an 8320 and a single R9 290. I find that a bit unbelievable as I only use an NH-D14 , and an Asus DirectCUII with a Kraken G10 and AIO mod applied(Zalman LQ320), plus memory and vrm heat sinks of course.

Here is a link to the score

screenshot.308.png

CPU is actually running at 5Ghz, 23x215. 
GPU running at 1240 GPU Clock, 6800 effective memory clock, 1412 mV, 150% power target. Max Temp after 3 FireStrike runs is 52C. 

screenshot.310.png

1112ua-5.png

Edit: Sorry I should have posted this in the 3dmark competition thread.

Edit: Found a new stable clock speed, I may try increasing this score later today if I have time.
mr5pvg-5.png
Not much of a difference though, I fear i am at my limit pushing the cpu any further, stability is getting too hard to locate.


Edited by rich1051414, 02 August 2014 - 06:25 AM.


#2 ccokeman

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 06:03 AM

Very nice! Thats one hell of a clock for a 290 on air! 


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#3 rich1051414

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 06:19 AM

Very nice! Thats one hell of a clock for a 290 on air! 

Actually the 290 water cooled. Well, sorta, an all in one. That alone seems a bit overkill though, since I am limited by the max limit of the voltage, and not heat. 


Edited by rich1051414, 02 August 2014 - 06:21 AM.


#4 ccokeman

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 06:27 AM

Even so its still pretty stout. 


Processor Intel Core I7 4690X  4.3Ghz
Memory G.Skill RipJaws  32GB 2400Mhz
Motherboard ASUS Rampage IV BE
Graphics  GTX TitanX x2
Power Corsair AX 1200,
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#5 rich1051414

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 06:40 AM

Even so its still pretty stout. 

While monitoring the gpu voltage from a third party tool, it is showing it is using 1.22-1.32. However, it is set to use 1.412, is this massive inconsistancy a normality? Would something be starving the card of voltage, is the sensor just way off, or is something else going on here?



#6 ccokeman

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 06:53 AM

Voltage droop occurs during peak loads. The other way to verify voltage is with a multimeter so you get a true picture of the voltage that is applied.  


Processor Intel Core I7 4690X  4.3Ghz
Memory G.Skill RipJaws  32GB 2400Mhz
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#7 rich1051414

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 07:04 AM

Voltage droop occurs during peak loads. The other way to verify voltage is with a multimeter so you get a true picture of the voltage that is applied.  

Well, the voltages everywhere else are spot on, if this were the case, wouldn't I be able to see drops in multiple locations, especially on the CPU which is drawing quite a bit more than the GPU? I was assuming the VRM's were just not delivering on their voltage, but I was hoping there was something simple to correct that.
My PSU is 3 weeks old and its a NZXT HALE82 700W. It shouldn't break a sweat.


Edited by rich1051414, 02 August 2014 - 07:05 AM.


#8 ccokeman

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 07:11 AM

Voltage droop is a function of the VRM and design. By using a multimeter you validate that you are actually supplying the applied 1.412v at idle so you can tell if you are indeed seeing a droop or if the applied voltage of 1.412v is just indicated rather than actually applied. You can see this when you extend the overclocking limits.   


Processor Intel Core I7 4690X  4.3Ghz
Memory G.Skill RipJaws  32GB 2400Mhz
Motherboard ASUS Rampage IV BE
Graphics  GTX TitanX x2
Power Corsair AX 1200,
Monitor ASUS PQ321Q
Cooling Liquid by comittee

Storage  OCZ RevoDrive 350 480GB  Seagate 8TB
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#9 rich1051414

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 07:15 AM

Voltage droop is a function of the VRM and design. By using a multimeter you validate that you are actually supplying the applied 1.412v at idle so you can tell if you are indeed seeing a droop or if the applied voltage of 1.412v is just indicated rather than actually applied. You can see this when you extend the overclocking limits.   

Ah, I gotcha. I appreciate the knowledge :) That makes complete sense.