Jump to content


Photo
* * * * * 5 votes

How To Successfully Build A Computer


  • Please log in to reply
70 replies to this topic

#25 Narcissus

Narcissus

    New Member

  • Members
  • 1 posts

Posted 18 September 2008 - 10:50 PM

I just purchased my parts from Newegg (Expected delivery is tomorrow, but watching the UPS tracking has me thinking they might be a tad late) and although I have found a few decent - good building guides, this is by far the very best one. Over at Tomshardware, I got loads of input on parts and such ... add that with your guide and I'm feeling like I'm in pretty great shape! Thanks!

Purchased system:

Antec Nine Hundred Mid Tower Case
CORSAIR 750TX 750W Power Supply
ASUS P5Q Pro P45 Mobo
C2D E8600 Proc
Seagate 640GB SATA Hard Drive
SAPPHIRE HD4870 X2 2GB Vid Card
4GB Mushkin (2 x 2GB) DDR2 800 Mem (5-4-4-12 1.8v)
Sunbeam "Core Contact Freezer" CPU Cooler
Arctic Silver 1.75G Thermal Compound <- was a waste because the sunbeamtech includes a tube of tx-2 :sigh:
LITE-ON 20X DVD±R DVD Burner - SATA

The main reason I signed up for this site was so that I could make a few comments about this guide. This fantastic, wonderful guide.

I would wager that most first-time PC builders fall into a category that (unfortunately) I myself fall into: 90% noob with 10% general knowledge. Your guide hits the 'sweet spot' in that it is overly-simplified, easy to understand ... yet fairly in-depth at the same time. I understand a few of the basic principles of computer building, but others are beyond me. My biggest confusion was based on exactly what needed to be done after I finished putting it together ... which through hours and hours of searching and reading I had somewhat pieced together.

This positively excellent guide made my still lingering doubts disappear. My only real complaint is that I didn't find this guide two or three days ago when I really started my research. This guide covers far more than: this cable goes here and that cable goes there (although that is covered fairly well also) ... it also covers the initial confusion as to what exactly happens afterwords.

A+ and two thumbs up and a million other neat-o type statements as well. Thanks a BILLION!

I do have a couple of recommendations and I'm somewhat loathe to say them as I don't want that to downplay the awesomeness of this guide to the average Joe (like me). Keep in mind that this guide simply rocks ...

It would be helpful to add a detailed description of how to apply thermal paste rather than give an outside link. Someone looking for a step-by-step guide (like me) will find it so much easier if all the general steps are covered in one place. Another thing that could be added on would be to detail the actual placement of the hardware inside of the case. I realize that it is so simple a caveman™ can do it, but when in doubt having a direct comparison (even though hardware will often be different) is invaluable.

Having said that ... again I feel the urge to thank you a thousand times and do funny little dances! Thanks!!!

Narcissus

#26 tkrow21

tkrow21

    Total Nerd

  • Folding Member
  • 3714 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York City

Posted 26 September 2008 - 01:03 PM

I don't have my parts yet, but I am reading up on this.

Go to your memory settings. Change the voltage to what is recommended by the manufacturer. Set the primary timings that are also recommended by your manufacturer (CAS/tRCD/tRP/tRAS/CMD - or CPC).

Shouldn't voltages be set by default?
Posted Image
It's the decisions you make when you have no time to make them that define who you are.

#27 Syngensmyth

Syngensmyth

    OCC Curmudgeon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2572 posts
  • Location:Lake Wobegon

Posted 26 September 2008 - 01:14 PM

Not always. Sometimes the BIOS does not set voltage properly - too high or too low. With memory too low is the most common.
Obituary: DFI LANPARTY Expert: Killed by rogue PSU / DFI LanParty Ultra-D: Mysterious Death
Living: Gigabyte 965 with e6400 / 2 -Ultra-D's & Opti 165 still going
Gateway 7811FX Notebook and lovin' it!
Build Guide - USB Boot - OC Guide

#28 tkrow21

tkrow21

    Total Nerd

  • Folding Member
  • 3714 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York City

Posted 26 September 2008 - 01:23 PM

Thanks sir!

Now, I'm going to be using a hard drive from an old computer, do I have to wipe everything off? Or can I pop it into the new computer?
Posted Image
It's the decisions you make when you have no time to make them that define who you are.

#29 Syngensmyth

Syngensmyth

    OCC Curmudgeon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2572 posts
  • Location:Lake Wobegon

Posted 26 September 2008 - 01:30 PM

Thanks sir!

Now, I'm going to be using a hard drive from an old computer, do I have to wipe everything off? Or can I pop it into the new computer?

I assume you are going to install a new operating system. When installing XP (?) you will delete partitions and make new partitions and format. The OS install will give you these options.

Simple answer: No need to wipe.

Edited by Syngensmyth, 26 September 2008 - 01:32 PM.

Obituary: DFI LANPARTY Expert: Killed by rogue PSU / DFI LanParty Ultra-D: Mysterious Death
Living: Gigabyte 965 with e6400 / 2 -Ultra-D's & Opti 165 still going
Gateway 7811FX Notebook and lovin' it!
Build Guide - USB Boot - OC Guide

#30 tkrow21

tkrow21

    Total Nerd

  • Folding Member
  • 3714 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York City

Posted 26 September 2008 - 02:05 PM

No need for a new OS.

I'll probably clean it to give it that "new" feeling anyway.
Posted Image
It's the decisions you make when you have no time to make them that define who you are.

#31 Syngensmyth

Syngensmyth

    OCC Curmudgeon

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2572 posts
  • Location:Lake Wobegon

Posted 26 September 2008 - 02:11 PM

No need for a new OS.

I'll probably clean it to give it that "new" feeling anyway.

I'm not sure you understood my answer. Not trying to argue but what I said, no need to wipe if you are installing a new OS.

If you are planning on using the old OS you can try a repair install. Of course you can always try ...

Just my attempt to clarify. I would do a clean install on a new system. But do as you wish.

Edited by Syngensmyth, 26 September 2008 - 02:13 PM.

Obituary: DFI LANPARTY Expert: Killed by rogue PSU / DFI LanParty Ultra-D: Mysterious Death
Living: Gigabyte 965 with e6400 / 2 -Ultra-D's & Opti 165 still going
Gateway 7811FX Notebook and lovin' it!
Build Guide - USB Boot - OC Guide

#32 paulktreg

paulktreg

    Member

  • Donated T5
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3992 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Clitheroe, UK.

Posted 26 September 2008 - 03:08 PM

Thanks!

If anybody has any comments, or thinks I should add anything, feel free to say so.


Crazy_Nate

If there's one thing I've learned over the years it is that electrostatic discharge can be a real problem. You touched on it briefly and the dangers of carpeted floors, nylon can be a killer

I served my apprenticeship, many years ago, as an electronics technician and the effects of static electricity are sometimes not immediately apparent. Most electronic devices can be damaged by electrostatic discharges, especially MOS devices, quite commonly used on computer hardware and the use of anti-static bags to wrap motherboards, graphic cards, etc., is for good reason. I can't explain it in simple terms really but MOS device substrates can get punctured by static discharges which may not cause immediate failure but stress the component leading to premature failure somewhere down the line, maybe months later.

To this end I think you should advise the use of anti-static wrist bands, especially for newcomers, when building computers as good practice:

Posted Image


They are available at most electronic component outlets for a few pounds (The one in the photograph is available from Radio Spares in the UK). The strap goes around the wrist and connects you via a 1 megaohm resistor to a convenient earth to which you attach the clip. If you wear it while installing the components into the case, crocodile clip connected to the case, power supply plugged in but NOT yet connected to any devices, it will ensure you are at the same potential as the case and usually prevents any electrostatic discharge occuring.

I honestly think the use of such devices can and will prevent problems some people have when putting systems together and it's well worth a mention.

Regards

Paul

Edited by paulktreg, 26 September 2008 - 03:21 PM.

i7 920/GA-X58A-UD3R/3x2GB Corsair/XFX HD7950/Seagate 1TB/Fractal Design Define R3 Case/Seasonic X-Series 760W/Acer H235H Monitor/Windows 10


#33 Crazy_Nate

Crazy_Nate

    Philosophy begins in wonder.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3918 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 26 September 2008 - 03:19 PM

Paul,

Thanks!

I've added a link to your post in my guide.

:thumbs-up:

OCC Recommended Power Supplies List - The Official OCC Raid Guide - OverclockersClub Rules - OCC Market Place Forum Rules - OCC IRC


Posted Image

Intel i5 650 @ 3.2 -- TR AXP-140 Passive -- Mushkin Blackline 2x2GB -- Asus Gene III P55 / mATX -- WD Caviar Black 1TB -- Corsair HX 750 -- Custom HTPC Case
AMD PII X4 965 -- Mushkin Silverline 2x4GB -- ASUS M4A88T-M -- WD Caviar Black 1TB -- Corsair HX 650 -- LIAN LI PC-V354A (Silver)


#34 paulktreg

paulktreg

    Member

  • Donated T5
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3992 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Clitheroe, UK.

Posted 26 September 2008 - 03:23 PM

Paul,

Thanks!

I've added a link to your post in my guide.

:thumbs-up:


Your welcome.

Regards

Paul

i7 920/GA-X58A-UD3R/3x2GB Corsair/XFX HD7950/Seagate 1TB/Fractal Design Define R3 Case/Seasonic X-Series 760W/Acer H235H Monitor/Windows 10


#35 GRN

GRN

    New Member

  • Members
  • 28 posts

Posted 20 November 2008 - 01:40 PM

Awesome review, it was very informative and to the point. I just have one question, for the memtest86, is it recommended to test out the memory? Cause I just plan to put everything together, fire it up, load all drivers and play. What do you think? And yes I'm a noobie when it come to computer building :(

#36 Crazy_Nate

Crazy_Nate

    Philosophy begins in wonder.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3918 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 20 November 2008 - 02:10 PM

If you happen to follow my guide, you will test the memory and processor (and I hint at ways to test your graphics card - 3DMark / FurMark / etc).

I would recommend testing your hardware, just from the standpoint that you've just obtained it and do not know that it works properly.

Yes, you can just put everything together and it could run. However, if something doesn't work properly, you'll have a very hard time figuring out what is broken. If you find that something isn't working properly while you are testing things on the motherboard box, it is much easier to RMA, than having to take things apart (ie, installed everything in your case).

It takes about a day or two to test, I usually run memtest86+ overnight and if I'm doing 8 hours of Prime95, I'll do that overnight, however, I usually like to go the full 24 hours.

If you can bear waiting a day or two to do the testing, I feel that it is definitely the way to go.

As an additional note, if your motherboard defaults to improper memory timings (or more importantly, voltages), it can be unstable. If one were to install an operating system under these conditions, there's no guarantee that the entire OS install is 100% correct...

OCC Recommended Power Supplies List - The Official OCC Raid Guide - OverclockersClub Rules - OCC Market Place Forum Rules - OCC IRC


Posted Image

Intel i5 650 @ 3.2 -- TR AXP-140 Passive -- Mushkin Blackline 2x2GB -- Asus Gene III P55 / mATX -- WD Caviar Black 1TB -- Corsair HX 750 -- Custom HTPC Case
AMD PII X4 965 -- Mushkin Silverline 2x4GB -- ASUS M4A88T-M -- WD Caviar Black 1TB -- Corsair HX 650 -- LIAN LI PC-V354A (Silver)