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News: Intel to Unveil Mobile Core 2 Extreme in Q3'2007


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#1 sdy284

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 09:53 PM

DailyTech Article
OCC News Post

Intel expects to introduce its high-end Core 2 Extreme branding to notebooks in Q3’2007 according to the latest roadmap. The upcoming Core 2 Extreme X7800 uses the same Merom core used by the Core 2 Duo mobile family of processors. Intel’s Core 2 Extreme X7800 will arrive clocked at 2.6 GHz, operate on an 800 MHz front-side bus and feature 4MB of L2 cache like the rest of the Core 2 Duo family. Intel technologies such as VT, EIST, EM64T and XD/NX bit are supported, though Intel has removed support for Intel Dynamic Acceleration.

The Core 2 Extreme X7800 for mobile will remain at the top of Intel’s chain of mobile processors until the upcoming Core 2 Extreme X7900 dethrones it in Q4’2007. This new model clocks at a high 2.8 GHz while retaining the same feature-set as the Core 2 Extreme X7800. These processors are only available for socket P only, unlike the Core 2 Duo product family which features socket P and BGA packaged chips.


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Joining the Core 2 Extreme X7900 in Q4’2007 is two new Core 2 Duo processors. As the Core 2 Extreme X7900 takes the flagship spot, Intel will release the Core 2 Duo T7800. The Core 2 Duo T7800 is identical to the Core 2 Extreme X7800, with the addition of Intel Dynamic Acceleration support. On the mainstream side of things, Intel will release the Core 2 Duo T7250 in Q4’2007 as well. This model is similar to the current Core 2 Duo T7300 except the L2 cache is halved to 2MB. The 2.0 GHz clock speed and 800 MHz front-side bus is identical to the Core 2 Duo T7300.

Expect Intel to pull the wraps off of its Core 2 Duo Extreme X7800 for notebooks in Q3’2007 with a $795 per-unit in 1,000-unit quantities price tag.


Edited by sdy284, 01 February 2007 - 09:54 PM.


#2 kingdingeling

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 10:07 PM

I somehow don't see why you need a chip with an unlocked multi in a notebook. Cooling is not good enough in those beasts to let any overclocking take place, so why?
What would be interesting however is if these chips work on desktop motherboards, as mobile chips are always cooler.

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#3 sdy284

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 10:09 PM

I somehow don't see why you need a chip with an unlocked multi in a notebook. Cooling is not good enough in those beasts to let any overclocking take place, so why?
What would be interesting however is if these chips work on desktop motherboards, as mobile chips are always cooler.

FYI, pretty much all mobile chips have unlocked multipliers.

Laptops use this feature to extend battery life by dropping the multiplier on the chip & thereby running @ a lower clock speed. This obviously increases battery life ;)

Edited by sdy284, 01 February 2007 - 10:10 PM.