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D-Link DNS-321 password access please?


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#1 Vaelen2001

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 12:05 PM

I have a 2 Terabyte D-Link DNS-321 NAS and would like to password protect it.

I run windows 7 and after mapping the drive, anyone can log into it if they are on my wired or wireless network. I want to prevent this.

Is there any way to set a directory password to even look into the root folder?

Thanks in advance for your networking knowledge as it's my weak point.

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#2 Nemo

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 06:41 PM

This is done through the Web-based management UI for the DNS-321. You will need to set up users/groups and then assign them to shares on the NAS. That way users will need permission to access the folder, others any folder designated as public will be accessible by anyone on the network. Some NAS servers allow you to designate whether a folder is browseable or not,\. I'm not familiar with the DNS-321 so I can't say whether it has this feature or not, but at the very least you can control whether a user has permissions to access the folder. Look in your manual for instructions on how to set up users/groups and assign them to folders.

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#3 Vaelen2001

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 02:36 PM

This is done through the Web-based management UI for the DNS-321. You will need to set up users/groups and then assign them to shares on the NAS. That way users will need permission to access the folder, others any folder designated as public will be accessible by anyone on the network. Some NAS servers allow you to designate whether a folder is browseable or not,\. I'm not familiar with the DNS-321 so I can't say whether it has this feature or not, but at the very least you can control whether a user has permissions to access the folder. Look in your manual for instructions on how to set up users/groups and assign them to folders.


Thank you for your reply Nemo!

I have an alternate idea, what if I use my secondary network port (I have two gigabit nic ports on my motherboard) to directly attach it to my computer through a crossover network cable. I'm really the only one that wants access to this NAS. Do you think this would work?
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#4 Nemo

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 06:39 PM

Thank you for your reply Nemo!

I have an alternate idea, what if I use my secondary network port (I have two gigabit nic ports on my motherboard) to directly attach it to my computer through a crossover network cable. I'm really the only one that wants access to this NAS. Do you think this would work?

Yes, that's how I test the NAS units in our reviews. You probably don't even have to use a crossover cable as most units these days have Auto-MDIX to detect whether the connection is backwards.

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#5 Vaelen2001

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 07:09 PM

Yes, that's how I test the NAS units in our reviews. You probably don't even have to use a crossover cable as most units these days have Auto-MDIX to detect whether the connection is backwards.



Ok so I tried this and I cannot get a valid IP address via DHCP ( who would assign it an IP address? itself or my pc?) also I am not using a crossover adapter just a straight cat-6 cable from the DNS-321 to my secondary nic port.

Any help is apprecaited guys. :)

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#6 Vaelen2001

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Posted 15 October 2010 - 11:11 PM

Still really need help with this guys...

So far I've tried telling the NAS to use a static IP address and then set my secondary network port to the same address but then I get an IP address conflict. So I set my secondary nic port to be DHCP assigned and all i get is a 169. IP address which is obviously invalid.

What am I doing wrong?

Do I turn on DHCP in the NAS or what? :(

Help please! ;)

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#7 Nemo

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 03:42 AM

First make sure your secondary NIC and the DNS-321 are not on the same IP address. Let your DHCP assign the address to both for starters.
Do not turn on DHCP in the NAS (if it has that feature, I don't remember off the top of my head).

Now on the PC you're using to connect to the NAS, go into Network Connections and bridge the primary and secondary NIC cards and see if that allows your DHCP server to see the NAS.

Also, you could assign a staic IP address to the NAS box and see if you can even ping it from the PC it's connected to. Just make sure you assign it an address on the same subnet as the PC and don't use an address that might conflict with another unit on the network.

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#8 viperk1

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 05:39 AM

So far I've tried telling the NAS to use a static IP address and then set my secondary network port to the same address but then I get an IP address conflict. So I set my secondary nic port to be DHCP assigned and all i get is a 169. IP address which is obviously invalid.


Set your secondary network port to a different IP address on the same subnet. An example:

Primary NIC (dhcp): 192.168.1.50, mask 255.255.255.0, gateway 192.168.1.1
Secondary NIC (static): 192.168.2.50, mask 255.255.255.0
NAS (static): 192.168.2.51, mask 255.255.255.0

(no gateway needed for direct attached network)
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