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Mushkin Joule 1000W Power Supply Reviewed


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#1 Nemo

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Posted 07 June 2010 - 02:45 AM

Mushkin is a well-known name in the computer memory business, but they also make power supplies. OCC takes a look at the Mushkin Joule 1000W Power Supply - http://www.overclock...iews/mush1000w/

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#2 Bosco

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Posted 07 June 2010 - 12:52 PM

I like the idea of having different colors for the fan. :)

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#3 krazypoloc

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Posted 07 June 2010 - 01:05 PM

Why is the fan so small? I fail to comprehend this design when every other PSU manufacturer uses 140mm fans these days.

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#4 boinker

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Posted 07 June 2010 - 04:07 PM

I was thinking about this power supply a while back but im kind of shy, How does its efficiency stack up with other psu's? I would guess that 77% isn't that bad but what is the line. I know 80 plus is where you are suppose to be but where is the line for a good psu drawn?

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#5 damian

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 10:15 AM

I've always liked Mushkin units, just for the fact that that they're different. But i wonder the same thing as boinker.

#6 paulktreg

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 03:22 PM

I was thinking about this power supply a while back but im kind of shy, How does its efficiency stack up with other psu's? I would guess that 77% isn't that bad but what is the line. I know 80 plus is where you are suppose to be but where is the line for a good psu drawn?


You shouldn't overlook the fact that it's 77% efficient at nearly full load, the power supply's capable of this 24/7 (or it should be and its not a test I'd like to do because of costs), but would any sane person run it at 1000W for any length of time? If you needed that much power then you'd go for a 1500W power supply wouldn't you? The claimed efficiency of 85% at typical loading translated to an efficiency of 84% at 500W which is really up there with most of the other high end power supplies.

The introduction of 80 Plus certification is a great idea but don't forget the 80 Plus Organisation gets it's main funding from the utility companies that generate your electricity and, call me a cynic if you like, I think the main reason for its introduction was to get power factor levels over 0.9 which in turn partly leads to higher efficiencies. Power factor is a strange beast that is the relationship of real power to apparent power but why would this concern the generating companies? Industrial users of electricity are penalised for poor power factor levels, not sure on the figures, but domestic users aren't. A power factor level of 0.75 for example would mean an apparent power of 133W and a real power of 100W and the industrial user would be charged for 133W but the domestic users only pay for 100W. The utility companies generate power to meet the apparent power demands so they can save themselves some money if power factor levels are kept high in the domestic sector and hence encourage the use of 80 Plus certified power supplies. How many domestic PC's are there in the USA with generic power supplies fitted and how much does it cost them, a considerable amount of money I'd guess, $millions?

Don't get me wrong, I'm all for 80 Plus, it saves the generating companies money, it saves the domestic user some money and as to be better for the environment in the overall scheme of things but what does it mean for average PC user?

Let's take a PC that pulls 300W from the power supply......

A power supply with 80% efficiency takes 375W from the wall outlet, 0.375kWh.

A power supply with 77% efficiency takes 390W from the wall outlet, 0.390kWh.

Average cost of electricity in the USA in 2009 was $0.12/kWh. (This is average because some states, California for example, have some crazy tariffs!).

Let's assume the PC is running 24/7 all year....

The PC with the 80% efficient power supply costs $394.20/year to run.

The PC with the 77% efficient power supply costs $409.97/year to run.

... and just for the sake of it let's throw in a low cost generic with an efficiency 65%, what will that cost? Answer $484.60/year.

I know not many people are running ther PC's at 300W for 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year (unless you fold?), but if you take it over 2, 3 or 4 years and look at how long you spend gaming on your PC the generic for this reason alone might not be the best idea?

What was the original question?

Don't discount a power supply that hasn't got 80 Plus certification or you could miss out on some great performers, read the reviews. I'm sure the certification process isn't free(?) so maybe some manufacturers choose not to submit their products. Efficiency and power factor levels are important when you look at the running costs but the figures don't necessarily mean poor electrical performance and won't impact on the PC's performance in any way, just your pocket!

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#7 damian

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Posted 10 June 2010 - 01:06 PM

Ah i get it, thanks for clearing that up, makes much more sense now.

#8 boinker

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Posted 20 June 2010 - 07:39 PM

That makes sense... I appreciate the clear up. :)

"It works Because I threatened it. :lol:" - " did you show it the sledgehammer" - "No, A flight of stairs"
"I don't want to be much of a forum Nazi but this situation calls for a hail Bosco and blitzkrieg someone".

If that does not work I hop in a Madcat and Blast it to microscopic Particles.