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Temps High on my overclock'd 3570k?


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#1 MadMan

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 11:06 AM

So I recently built a new computer and decided to overclock it.  After finding out that one of the bios's on the mobo is fubar (I change settings and they never save in bios) I switched over to the bios that does allow me to make changes.  After a few trial and error runs and some prime95 testing I ended up with 100x46 for 4600mhz so far.  When I tried x47 it would boot into windows but would fail stress testing in p95 after about the 5th test in.  Upon watching temps for a bit I was a bit concerned they are a bit high especially having a h100i installed running the fans on max...I used the thermal paste pad the h100i had on it when it came...should I scrape this off and put on Artic Silver 5? Also I know I didn't mess with the vcore settings I believe they are still on auto....might try and see if I can't get that lower than the 1.4 its at. After attempting multiple times to try and lower the vcore the most I could was down to 1.37...well in bios its set to 1.40 but in windows its 1.37 any lower and the system goes unstable however temps dropped a little bit..seeing them between 81 to 86. Idle temps are low 30's though.

 

edit:inserted pictures showing idle temps and load temps after manually setting vcore

Attached Thumbnails

  • 4.6ghz OC.png
  • 4.6ghz idle.png
  • 4.6ghz half hour p95.png

Edited by MadMan, 01 April 2013 - 05:26 AM.

Main Rig:

CPU: Intel i5 [email protected] 30c idle 70c load

Cooler: Corsair H100i

Mobo: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD4H

Ram: 2x8gb 16gb Gskill 2400mhz

Vid Card:2X eVGA GTX 660 Superclocked in SLI

SSD: 256gb Samsung 840 Pro

CD/DVD: Lite-On DVD RW

Monitor: 24" Asus VE248h

Speakers: Poloroid headphones or speakers thru monitor

Keyboard/Mouse: Logitech Mx5500 Revolution

Power Supply: Corsair HX750

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#2 d6bmg

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 07:30 AM

You should try & reset the cooler and check the temperatures again.


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#3 MadMan

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 05:38 AM

Well I went and reset my cooler and ended up bending 2 of the standoffs for the h100i and one broke...however similar temps....then I went to remove a 660 and broke off half of the 8x pci express slot on the mobo...GREAT!!!(With a whole lot of swearing and screaming at the top of my lungs!) Contacted Gigabyte and they will RMA it...contacted Corsair and they are going to be sending me another set of standoffs and thumbscrews...ugh...soooooo frustrating!!! I swear when this does finally come back to me and I put it together im never touching it again. Until then im looking into this process called deliding...from what i've seen it might be worth a shot especially with this damn 3570k...too friggin hot!! But some have shown as much as 20 degrees celcius drop...who knows...going to do some more research on it...might give me something to do while the mobo is out to get repaired


Main Rig:

CPU: Intel i5 [email protected] 30c idle 70c load

Cooler: Corsair H100i

Mobo: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD4H

Ram: 2x8gb 16gb Gskill 2400mhz

Vid Card:2X eVGA GTX 660 Superclocked in SLI

SSD: 256gb Samsung 840 Pro

CD/DVD: Lite-On DVD RW

Monitor: 24" Asus VE248h

Speakers: Poloroid headphones or speakers thru monitor

Keyboard/Mouse: Logitech Mx5500 Revolution

Power Supply: Corsair HX750

Bitfenix Venom Window Case


#4 wevsspot

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 07:06 AM

Madman - based on your experiences with "simple" things (and I'm not trying to be a jerk here) you might skip the delid idea, or get someone who has done it before to do it for you.  You really need a steady hand, a sharp razor blade and lots of patience to do that and not mess up any of the transistors or traces on the die itself.

 

And this is just my personal opinion here......... I wouldn't run an Ivy Bridge CPU at 1.40v 24/7

 

If I were in your position I'd set a maximum vcore of 1.32 to 1.35 and get whatever you can out of that.


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#5 d6bmg

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 09:17 AM

:withstupid:

Breaking 2 standoffs and breaking one means you are not experienced ith these kind of stuff at all. Call in someone experienced with replacing stuffs.


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#6 Prunes

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 09:24 AM

I know this is OCC and all, but be honest with yourself. You won't feel much difference between 4.0GHz and 4.6GHz in most daily applications, not even in games. At least that's my experience. And the lower OC will allow you to lower the voltage by a substantial amount. The only place you'll benefit from the higher OC is during benchmarks and very cpu heavy applications. Listen to Wevsspot. He's got years of experience and therefore his words carries substantial weight. Same goes for d6b.


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My rig:

Mobo: Asus P8Z68 Pro Gen 3
CPU: Intel i5 2500k @ 4.3
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i with 2x Corsair SP 120 Quiet Edition
GPU: MSI GTX 670 Power Edition
SSD: Samsung 840 Pro 128 GB
HDD: WD Cavier Black 1TB
PSU: Corsair AX860i
Case: Fractal Design R4 Black

 


#7 wevsspot

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 10:49 AM

I know this is OCC and all, but be honest with yourself. You won't feel much difference between 4.0GHz and 4.6GHz in most daily applications, not even in games. At least that's my experience. And the lower OC will allow you to lower the voltage by a substantial amount. 

 

QFT   :)   

 

When you overclock, at some time you reach the point of diminishing returns.  If you're an avid gamer just do some time / fps benchmarks yourself.  Start out with a relatively sane 4.0Ghz overclock, run tests, bump OC up to 4.2Ghz, re-run tests, bump to 4.4Ghz etc.  Sure we are all OCC'ers, but the max overclocks are just for s*its and giggles, bragging rights, epeens, competition and what not most of the time.  Many of us will settle for less than max overclocks 24/7 just to keep good temps at reasonable voltages.


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#8 El_Capitan

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 01:29 PM

I pretty much share the same sentiments as the others have. Mind you that it's not really your cooling holding you back for temps, but the TIM on the IHS for Ivy Bridge CPU's. As seen here: http://forums.overcl...howtopic=195637, the difference between 4.6GHz and 4.7GHz is .06V's in the BIOS, but the temps are largely the same. Once that TIM starts heating up, it doesn't matter how good your cooling is (I have a 480mm radiator dedicated to an i7-3770K with Maingear Epic T1000 perfectly applied, and it still gets to 86C - when a previous 2700K on the same setup and TIM at 4.9GHz and the same voltages never got higher than 67C).

 

One thing I noticed is that you should play around with your LLC, so that your BIOS voltage reflects closer what your actual voltages are during load. If you set your BIOS voltage to 1.4 and you're getting 1.37V Load in CPU-Z and 1.4V Idle, you'll find stability easier to figure out if it was 1.4V idle and 1.416V load. Other people go with different types of overclocking. For example, 3.5GHz and 1.1V's idle, 4.0GHz and 1.25V's 50% load, and 4.5GHz and 1.35V's 100% load. Some prefer overclocking that way to lessen power consumption or to ensure a longer lifespan by not keeping voltages too high, but to me, the power consumption savings are minimal, and no one really knows how much the higher voltages will affect the lifespan, but by the time we find out, we really won't care. There's still some CPU's out from 8 years ago that have been overclocked and still kicking butt, but most people have moved onto newer CPU's already. Most likely other components in your system will go bad before your CPU will. At any rate, I keep my CPU's at my overclocked speed 24/7 even during idle, and I've had no issues so far.



#9 MadMan

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 03:12 AM

Well after reading more into the delid process I decided against it...read this is mostly for those who have natural high temp issues and not high temps from cranking vcore up to 1.4.  So I won't be delid'ing, the mobo got sent out yesterday, and hope to hear from corsair soon on getting replacement standoffs and thumbscrews. Once I do get it back I think I will stick with what you said wev and just lower the vcore and see what I can get out of that....was just hoping to get a high oc but I think I got one of the bad batch's of 3570k's.  I've read where people have them at 4.6ghz without even breaking 1.25 vcore and yet I need 1.4 just to stay stable at 4.6 :( Thank you all for the info and I will post back when I get the mobo back and up and running.


Main Rig:

CPU: Intel i5 [email protected] 30c idle 70c load

Cooler: Corsair H100i

Mobo: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD4H

Ram: 2x8gb 16gb Gskill 2400mhz

Vid Card:2X eVGA GTX 660 Superclocked in SLI

SSD: 256gb Samsung 840 Pro

CD/DVD: Lite-On DVD RW

Monitor: 24" Asus VE248h

Speakers: Poloroid headphones or speakers thru monitor

Keyboard/Mouse: Logitech Mx5500 Revolution

Power Supply: Corsair HX750

Bitfenix Venom Window Case


#10 wevsspot

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 05:26 AM

I'm glad you decided against the delid option MadMan.  I'd hate to see something else break on you.  The other thing I noticed is that you are running super high speed memory.

 

What you're going to find is that in order to achieve complete stability with any overclock on your CPU you're going to have to increase the VTT Profile Voltage a little bit to compensate for that super high speed memory that you're running.  Give it a bump .02v to .05v over stock and see if that helps.

 

When you get your board back I'd do it like this;

 

Remove the motherboard battery and put the CMOS jumper to the "Short - clear CMOS values" position while you're re-assembling everything

After you're done assembling, install motherboard battery and remove the CMOS jumper pin

Power up, enter BIOS and load optimized defaults (don't forget to set the correct date and time too   :))

Reboot and load XMP Profile (this should get your memory running at the optimized speed, timing and voltage)

Boot again and run Memtest to make sure everything is stable at that point

 

Then we can take it from there.

 

Honestly though, if I was wanting the best CPU clocks I'd consider shooting for memory speed of DDR3 1866Mhz or DDR3 2133Mhz with tighter timings. 


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#11 Waco

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 05:46 AM

You RMA'd a board you broke? :(

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#12 wevsspot

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 05:59 AM

He did, but I'm under the impression that he explained to Gigabyte what happened.  And if he didn't they surely won't exchange the board for "free" once they see the broken PCIe slot.  And if they do, then he should count his blessings  :)


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