Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Replacing my heatsink with a plastic one


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 sdy284

sdy284

    Mr. Staypuft

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8303 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NW Chicago 'Burbs, Illinois

Posted 10 March 2010 - 09:50 AM

well not yet, but hopefully in the future

#2 psycho_terror

psycho_terror

    OCC 4 LIFE

  • Folding Member
  • 571 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 10 March 2010 - 09:56 AM

don't quite understand this technology. moving heat in a single direction may be good for removing it, but it still needs to be dissipated. perhaps this will replace heatpipes or something.

i'm still waiting on that ionic wind cooling stuff.

Gigabyte Z68XP-UD3P // Intel i5 2500k @ 4.5GHz // 16GB Corsair Vengeance 1600MHz // KFA2 GTX 660ti EX OC 3GB
XSPC Delta CPU Block // Black Ice Xtreme II // Laing DDC + Alphacool Top
Daewoo 1680x1050 22" // Optoma GT-7000 720p 120"
Samsung F1 1TB // Samsung F3 1TB // Seagate 7200.10 320GB // Seagate 7200.12 320GB // 32GB Sandisk ReadyCache SSD


#3 sdy284

sdy284

    Mr. Staypuft

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8303 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NW Chicago 'Burbs, Illinois

Posted 10 March 2010 - 10:00 AM

don't quite understand this technology. moving heat in a single direction may be good for removing it, but it still needs to be dissipated. perhaps this will replace heatpipes or something.

i'm still waiting on that ionic wind cooling stuff.


well obviously it'll need a fan to dissipate the heat, but only conducting in a single direction is great because ambient temps will have little to no effect on your CPU (or whatever your cooling)

#4 Waco

Waco

    Lab Rat 2

  • Reviewer
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15204 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Los Alamos, NM

Posted 10 March 2010 - 10:35 AM

Is 300 times more conductive than polyethylene even close to what copper/aluminum/etc can do?

Posted Image

Booyah.


#5 hardnrg

hardnrg

    Overclocking the i7... finally

  • Honorary Staff
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16487 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester, UK

Posted 10 March 2010 - 11:24 AM

lol, that's what I wondered... 300 times more than plastic... I can see it being used for chip casing, so stuff like power transistors (e.g. MOSFETs) would benefit... but I really do wonder on the thermal conductivity compared to any metal

it might end up being used as secondary heat conduction, like laptop shells...

but who knows what science can come up with in polymer technology :)

( How To Ask A Question ) · ( F@H Sigpics ) · ( Rules ) · ( USB Bootdrive ) · ( Modding & Computer Stores ) · ( OCC facebook.png )
i7 920 D0 @ 21x196=4116, HT on · D-Tek Fuzion v1 · 3x2GB Corsair XMS3 PC3-10666 @ DDR1176, 8-8-8-22-1T
BFG/XFX GTX260 Maxcore SLI @ 756/1512/1188 (Swiftech MCW60-R + Swiftech GTX200) · Asus P6T Deluxe V2
X-Fi XtremeMusic (Hotrodded) · PCP&C Silencer 750

Athlon II X4 635 @ 2900 · 2x 2GB PC2-6400 · HD5550 1GB · Asus M4A77D · Antec Neopower 480

EeePC 1000H @ 12x164=1965 · 1x 2GB Corsair VS PC2-5300 · Gigabyte Aircruiser N300 GN-WI06N

 


#6 sdy284

sdy284

    Mr. Staypuft

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8303 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NW Chicago 'Burbs, Illinois

Posted 10 March 2010 - 12:13 PM

Even greater gains are likely to be possible as the technique is improved, says Chen, noting that the results achieved so far already represent the highest thermal conductivity ever seen in any polymer material. Already, the degree of conductivity they produce, if such fibers could be made in quantity, could provide a cheaper alternative to metals used for heat transfer in many applications, especially ones where the directional characteristics would come in handy, such as heat-exchanger fins